Next Article in Journal
Omega-3 Index and Anti-Arrhythmic Potential of Omega-3 PUFAs
Next Article in Special Issue
Maternal Iodine Intake and Offspring Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Results from a Large Prospective Cohort Study
Previous Article in Journal
Kiwifruit Non-Sugar Components Reduce Glycaemic Response to Co-Ingested Cereal in Humans
Open AccessArticle

The Impact of Iodine Status on the Recall Rate of the Screening Program for Congenital Hypothyroidism: Findings from Two National Studies in Iran

1
Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, 1985717413, Tehran, Iran
2
Endocrinology and Metabolic Office, Center for Disease Control, Ministry of Health and Medical Education, 1419943471,Tehran, Iran
3
Prevention of Metabolic Disorders Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences & Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, 1985717413, Tehran, Iran
4
Family Health Institute, Breastfeeding Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences,1419943471, Tehran, Iran
5
Nutrition Office, Iran Ministry of Health, Treatment and Medical Education, 1419943471, Tehran, Iran
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2017, 9(11), 1194; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9111194
Received: 3 August 2017 / Revised: 14 October 2017 / Accepted: 18 October 2017 / Published: 30 October 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Iodine and Health throughout the Lifecourse)
Back ground: Iodine deficiency is one of the important factors in increasing the recall rate in congenital hypothyroidism (CH) screening programs. The present study assessed whether the iodine status of the general population may predict the recall rate or vice versa. Methods: In the current national study, among 1,382,229 live births delivered between March 2010 and March 2011, 1,288,237 neonates were screened for detecting CH by TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) measurement via heel prick sampling. Simultaneously, a total of 11,280 school-aged children, aged 7–8 years, were selected using random multi-cluster sampling for measurement of urinary iodine. Results: A negative correlation was found between median urinary iodine (MUI) and the recall rate (r = −0.33, p = 0.03). No correlation was found between MUIC (median urinary iodine concentration) and the incidence rate of CH. Linear regression analysis showed a 0.1% increase in the recall rate for a one unit decrease in MUIC (β = −0.11, 95% CI: −0.2, −0.1, p = 0.03). MUIC, at a cut-off point of 144.7 µg/L, was predictive for a recall rate < 3% (p = 0.05). Conclusion: Frequencies of TSH ≥ 5 mU/L may be a more sensitive indicator for iodine status during pregnancy rather than in the general population. As higher recall rates reflect inadequate iodine nutrition, sufficient iodine supplementation is needed to reduce the recall rate in such communities. View Full-Text
Keywords: iodine deficiency; congenital hypothyroidism; thyroid stimulating hormone; screening iodine deficiency; congenital hypothyroidism; thyroid stimulating hormone; screening
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Mehran, L.; Yarahmadi, S.; Khalili, D.; Nazeri, P.; Delshad, H.; Abdollahi, Z.; Azhang, N.; Azizi, F. The Impact of Iodine Status on the Recall Rate of the Screening Program for Congenital Hypothyroidism: Findings from Two National Studies in Iran. Nutrients 2017, 9, 1194.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop