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The Role of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) in Insulin Signaling

Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Gachon University, Incheon 21999, Korea
Nutrients 2017, 9(11), 1176; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9111176
Received: 21 September 2017 / Revised: 23 October 2017 / Accepted: 24 October 2017 / Published: 27 October 2017
The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase that controls a wide spectrum of cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and metabolism. mTOR forms two distinct multiprotein complexes known as mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2), which are characterized by the presence of raptor and rictor, respectively. mTOR controls insulin signaling by regulating several downstream components such as growth factor receptor-bound protein 10 (Grb10), insulin receptor substrate (IRS-1), F-box/WD repeat-containing protein 8 (Fbw8), and insulin like growth factor 1 receptor/insulin receptor (IGF-IR/IR). In addition, mTORC1 and mTORC2 regulate each other through a feedback loop to control cell growth. This review outlines the current understanding of mTOR regulation in insulin signaling in the context of whole body metabolism. View Full-Text
Keywords: insulin; mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR); mTOR complex1 (mTORC1); mTOR complex2 (mTORC2); protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) insulin; mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR); mTOR complex1 (mTORC1); mTOR complex2 (mTORC2); protein kinase B (PKB/Akt)
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Yoon, M.-S. The Role of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) in Insulin Signaling. Nutrients 2017, 9, 1176.

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