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Article

A Meta-Analysis of Obesity and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in Patients with Lynch Syndrome: The Impact of Sex and Genetics

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Division of Cancer Prevention and Genetics, European Institute of Oncology (IEO) IRCCS, 20141 Milan, Italy
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Department of Experimental Oncology, European Institute of Oncology (IEO) IRCCS, 20141 Milan, Italy
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Department of Colorectal Medicine and Genetics, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, VIC 3050, Australia
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Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3050, Australia
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Victorian Comprehensive Cancer Centre, University of Melbourne Centre for Cancer Research, Parkville, VIC 3050, Australia
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Cancer Risk Factors and Lifestyle Epidemiology Unit, Institute for Cancer Research, Prevention and Clinical Network (ISPRO), 50139 Florence, Italy
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Lynnette Ferguson
Nutrients 2021, 13(5), 1736; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13051736
Received: 15 April 2021 / Revised: 10 May 2021 / Accepted: 17 May 2021 / Published: 20 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Nutrigenetics and Nutrigenomics)
There appears to be a sex-specific association between obesity and colorectal neoplasia in patients with Lynch Syndrome (LS). We meta-analyzed studies reporting on obesity and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk in LS patients to test whether obese subjects were at increased risk of cancer compared to those of normal weight. We explored also a possible sex-specific relationship between adiposity and CRC risk among patients with LS. The summary relative risk (SRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated through random effect models. We investigated the causes of between-study heterogeneity and assessed the presence of publication bias. We were able to retrieve suitable data from four independent studies. We found a twofold risk of CRC in obese men compared to nonobese men (SRR = 2.09; 95%CI: 1.23–3.55, I2 = 33%), and no indication of publication bias (p = 0.13). No significantly increased risk due to obesity was found for women. A 49% increased CRC risk for obesity was found for subjects with an MLH1 mutation (SRR = 1.49; 95%CI: 1.11–1.99, I2 = 0%). These results confirm the different effects of sex on obesity and CRC risk and also support the public measures to reduce overweight in people with LS, particularly for men. View Full-Text
Keywords: lynch syndrome; colorectal cancer; gender difference; body weight lynch syndrome; colorectal cancer; gender difference; body weight
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lazzeroni, M.; Bellerba, F.; Calvello, M.; Macrae, F.; Win, A.K.; Jenkins, M.; Serrano, D.; Marabelli, M.; Cagnacci, S.; Tolva, G.; Macis, D.; Raimondi, S.; Mazzarella, L.; Chiocca, S.; Caini, S.; Bertario, L.; Bonanni, B.; Gandini, S. A Meta-Analysis of Obesity and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in Patients with Lynch Syndrome: The Impact of Sex and Genetics. Nutrients 2021, 13, 1736. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13051736

AMA Style

Lazzeroni M, Bellerba F, Calvello M, Macrae F, Win AK, Jenkins M, Serrano D, Marabelli M, Cagnacci S, Tolva G, Macis D, Raimondi S, Mazzarella L, Chiocca S, Caini S, Bertario L, Bonanni B, Gandini S. A Meta-Analysis of Obesity and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in Patients with Lynch Syndrome: The Impact of Sex and Genetics. Nutrients. 2021; 13(5):1736. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13051736

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lazzeroni, Matteo, Federica Bellerba, Mariarosaria Calvello, Finlay Macrae, Aung K. Win, Mark Jenkins, Davide Serrano, Monica Marabelli, Sara Cagnacci, Gianluca Tolva, Debora Macis, Sara Raimondi, Luca Mazzarella, Susanna Chiocca, Saverio Caini, Lucio Bertario, Bernardo Bonanni, and Sara Gandini. 2021. "A Meta-Analysis of Obesity and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in Patients with Lynch Syndrome: The Impact of Sex and Genetics" Nutrients 13, no. 5: 1736. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13051736

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