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Article

Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency in a Large Newborn Cohort from Northern United States and Effect of Intrauterine Drug Exposure

1
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Case Western Reserve University, Metro Health Medical Center, 2500 MetroHealth Drive, Cleveland, OH 44109, USA
2
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Memorial Hospital of Carbondale, IL 62901, USA
3
Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Section of Biostatistics, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current address: Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Indiana University School of Medicine, The Women’s Hospital-Deaconess, 4199 Gateway Blvd, Newburgh, IN 47630, USA.
Nutrients 2020, 12(7), 2085; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12072085
Received: 7 June 2020 / Revised: 1 July 2020 / Accepted: 12 July 2020 / Published: 14 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Micronutrients and Human Health)
Vitamin D is not only a vital element in bone health but is also a prohormone. Data regarding distribution of vitamin D status among preterm and term neonates in the United States are limited. There are no data on the effect of intrauterine drug exposure on vitamin D status. Our objective was to determine the distribution of vitamin D levels among preterm and term neonates and the effect of intrauterine illicit drug exposure. We did a retrospective chart review of neonates admitted from 2009 to 2016 to our neonatal intensive care unit with serum 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25[OH]D) levels measured during the hospital stay. Of 1517 neonates, the median 25[OH]D level was 19 ng/mL with 31% deficient and 49% insufficient, even though 75% of mothers took prenatal vitamins. In pregnant women, 38% were vitamin-D-deficient and 44% were vitamin-D-insufficient. Four hundred seventy-one neonates had intrauterine drug exposure, with a median 25[OH]D level of 22.9 ng/mL versus 17.8 ng/mL in nonexposed neonates (p = 0.001). Despite maternal prenatal vitamin intake, neonates are at risk of vitamin D deficiency. Maternal illicit drug use was not related to lower 25[OH]D levels in neonates. View Full-Text
Keywords: vitamin D deficiency; newborn; preterm; maternal vitamin D deficiency; intrauterine drug exposure vitamin D deficiency; newborn; preterm; maternal vitamin D deficiency; intrauterine drug exposure
MDPI and ACS Style

Kanike, N.; Hospattankar, K.G.; Sharma, A.; Worley, S.; Groh-Wargo, S. Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency in a Large Newborn Cohort from Northern United States and Effect of Intrauterine Drug Exposure. Nutrients 2020, 12, 2085. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12072085

AMA Style

Kanike N, Hospattankar KG, Sharma A, Worley S, Groh-Wargo S. Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency in a Large Newborn Cohort from Northern United States and Effect of Intrauterine Drug Exposure. Nutrients. 2020; 12(7):2085. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12072085

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kanike, Neelakanta, Krupa G. Hospattankar, Amit Sharma, Sarah Worley, and Sharon Groh-Wargo. 2020. "Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency in a Large Newborn Cohort from Northern United States and Effect of Intrauterine Drug Exposure" Nutrients 12, no. 7: 2085. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12072085

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