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Article

In Vitro Fermentation of Sheep and Cow Milk Using Infant Fecal Bacteria

1
AgResearch Ltd., Grasslands Research Centre, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand
2
Faculty of Life Sciences, Rhine-Waal University of Applied Sciences, 47533 Kleve, Germany
3
Riddet Institute, Massey University, Palmerston North 4474, New Zealand
4
High Value Nutrition, National Science Challenges, The Liggins Institute at the University of Auckland, Auckland 1010, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(6), 1802; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061802
Received: 30 April 2020 / Revised: 3 June 2020 / Accepted: 7 June 2020 / Published: 17 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Nutrigenetics and Nutrigenomics)
While human milk is the optimal food for infants, formulas that contain ruminant milk can have an important role where breastfeeding is not possible. In this regard, cow milk is most commonly used. However, recent years have brought interest in other ruminant milk. While many similarities exist between ruminant milk, there are likely enough compositional differences to promote different effects in the infant. This may include effects on different bacteria in the large bowel, leading to different metabolites in the gut. In this study sheep and cow milk were digested using an in vitro infant digestive model, followed by fecal fermentation using cultures inoculated with fecal material from two infants of one month and five months of age. The effects of the cow and sheep milk on the fecal microbiota, short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), and other metabolites were investigated. Significant differences in microbial, SCFA, and metabolite composition were observed between fermentation of sheep and cow milk using fecal inoculum from a one-month-old infant, but comparatively minimal differences using fecal inoculum from a five-month-old infant. These results show that sheep milk and cow milk can have differential effects on the gut microbiota, while demonstrating the individuality of the gut microbiome. View Full-Text
Keywords: ovine milk; bovine milk; digestibility; in vitro digestion; infant gut microbiome; fecal fermentation; NMR; short-chain fatty acids; metabolomics ovine milk; bovine milk; digestibility; in vitro digestion; infant gut microbiome; fecal fermentation; NMR; short-chain fatty acids; metabolomics
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ahlborn, N.; Young, W.; Mullaney, J.; Samuelsson, L.M. In Vitro Fermentation of Sheep and Cow Milk Using Infant Fecal Bacteria. Nutrients 2020, 12, 1802. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061802

AMA Style

Ahlborn N, Young W, Mullaney J, Samuelsson LM. In Vitro Fermentation of Sheep and Cow Milk Using Infant Fecal Bacteria. Nutrients. 2020; 12(6):1802. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061802

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ahlborn, Natalie, Wayne Young, Jane Mullaney, and Linda M. Samuelsson. 2020. "In Vitro Fermentation of Sheep and Cow Milk Using Infant Fecal Bacteria" Nutrients 12, no. 6: 1802. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061802

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