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A Fatty Acid Mouth Rinse Decreases Self-Reported Hunger and Increases Self-Reported Fullness in Healthy Australian Adults: A Randomized Cross-Over Trial

CASS Food Research Centre, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences Deakin University, 1 Gheringhap St, 3220 Geelong, VIC, Australia
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Nutrients 2020, 12(3), 678; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030678
Received: 9 January 2020 / Revised: 27 February 2020 / Accepted: 28 February 2020 / Published: 2 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Taste Perception and Food Preferences)
Fatty acid (FA) chemoreception in the oral cavity, known as fat taste, may trigger a satiety response that is homologous to FA chemoreception in the gastrointestinal tract. In addition, individuals with an impaired fat taste sensitivity are more likely to have an impaired satiety response. This study aimed to assess the effect of an FA mouth rinse on self-reported appetite, and to determine if the effect is modified by fat taste sensitivity. Thirty-one participants (age, 32.0 ± 8.4 y; body mass index (BMI), 26.1 ± 8.1 kg/m2) were studied on four separate days to evaluate the effect of a 20 mM oleic acid (OA) mouth rinse (in duplicate) compared to a control (in duplicate) on self-reported appetite by using a visual analogue scale (VAS) every 30 min for three hours following a standardized low-fat breakfast. The area under the curve ratings for fullness were greater (p = 0.003), and those for hunger were lower (p = 0.002) following the OA rinse compared to the control. The effect of the OA rinse was greater in individuals who were hypersensitive to fat taste compared to moderately sensitive and hyposensitive individuals for fullness (p < 0.010) and hunger (p < 0.010) ratings. In summary, an OA mouth rinse decreases self-reported hunger and increases self-reported fullness, particularly in those who are more sensitive to fat taste. FA receptors in the oral cavity may be potential targets to regulate appetite. View Full-Text
Keywords: fat taste; satiety; mouth rinse; appetite; sensitivity fat taste; satiety; mouth rinse; appetite; sensitivity
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Costanzo, A.; Russell, C.G.; Lewin, S.; Keast, R. A Fatty Acid Mouth Rinse Decreases Self-Reported Hunger and Increases Self-Reported Fullness in Healthy Australian Adults: A Randomized Cross-Over Trial. Nutrients 2020, 12, 678.

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