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Open AccessCommentary

Should We Prescribe More Protein to Critically Ill Patients?

1
Department of Critical Care Medicine, Kingston General Hospital, Kingston, ON K7L 2V7, Canada
2
Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6, Canada
3
Clinical Evaluation Research Unit, Kingston General Hospital, Kingston, ON K7L 2V7, Canada
4
Pulmonary and Critical Care Division, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT 05405, USA
5
Biobehavioral Research Laboratory, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(4), 462; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10040462
Received: 13 March 2018 / Revised: 3 April 2018 / Accepted: 5 April 2018 / Published: 7 April 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Enteral Nutrition)
In the context of critical illness, evidence suggests that exogenous protein/amino acid supplementation has the potential to favorably impact whole-body protein balance. Whether this translates into retention of muscle, greater muscle strength, and improved survival and physical recovery of critically ill patients remains uncertain. The purpose of this brief commentary is to provide an overview of the clinical evidence for and against increasing protein doses and to introduce two new trials that will add considerably to our evolving understanding of protein requirements in the critically ill adult patient. View Full-Text
Keywords: EFFORT trial; NEXIS trial; high protein; critical care nutrition; critically ill; protein supplementation EFFORT trial; NEXIS trial; high protein; critical care nutrition; critically ill; protein supplementation
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Heyland, D.K.; Stapleton, R.; Compher, C. Should We Prescribe More Protein to Critically Ill Patients? Nutrients 2018, 10, 462.

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