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Open AccessArticle

Environmental Aftermath of the 2019 Stromboli Eruption

1
Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Via La Pira 4, 50121 Firenze, Italy
2
Dipartimento di Sociologia e Diritto dell’Economia, Alma Mater Studiorum-Università di Bologna, Sede Strada Maggiore 45, 40125 Bologna, Italy
3
Dipartimento di Architettura, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Via Micheli 2, 50121 Firenze, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(6), 994; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12060994
Received: 25 February 2020 / Revised: 17 March 2020 / Accepted: 18 March 2020 / Published: 19 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing for Disaster Risk Management)
This study focuses on the July-August 2019 eruption-induced wildfires at the Stromboli island (Italy). The analysis of land cover (LC) and land use (LU) changes has been crucial to describe the environmental impacts concerning endemic vegetation loss, damages to agricultural heritage, and transformations to landscape patterns. Moreover, a survey was useful to collect eyewitness accounts aimed to define the LU and to obtain detailed information about eruption-induced damages. Detection of burnt areas was based on PLÉIADES-1 and Sentinel-2 satellite imagery, and field surveys. Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR) and Relativized Burn Ratio (RBR) allowed mapping areas impacted by fires. LC and LU classification involved the detection of new classes, following the environmental units of landscape, being the result of the intersection between CORINE Land Cover project (CLC) and local landscape patterns. The results of multi-temporal comparison show that fire-damaged areas amount to 39% of the total area of the island, mainly affecting agricultural and semi-natural vegetated areas, being composed by endemic Aeolian species and abandoned olive trees that were cultivated by exploiting terraces up to high altitudes. LC and LU analysis has shown the strong correlation between land use management, wildfire severity, and eruption-induced damages on the island. View Full-Text
Keywords: Sentinel-2; PLÉIADES; optical remote sensing; volcano remote sensing; wildfires; wildfire severity; land use; land cover; regional planning; Aeolian Archipelago; Stromboli Sentinel-2; PLÉIADES; optical remote sensing; volcano remote sensing; wildfires; wildfire severity; land use; land cover; regional planning; Aeolian Archipelago; Stromboli
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MDPI and ACS Style

Turchi, A.; Di Traglia, F.; Luti, T.; Olori, D.; Zetti, I.; Fanti, R. Environmental Aftermath of the 2019 Stromboli Eruption. Remote Sens. 2020, 12, 994.

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