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Article

Locally Available Organic Waste for Counteracting Strawberry Decline in a Mountain Specialized Cropping Area

1
Laimburg Research Centre, 39040 Ora-Auer, Italy
2
Council for Agricultural Research and Economics (CREA), Research Center Agriculture and Environment, 40128 Bologna, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Ugo De Corato and Marc A. Rosen
Sustainability 2021, 13(7), 3964; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13073964
Received: 19 February 2021 / Revised: 22 March 2021 / Accepted: 26 March 2021 / Published: 2 April 2021
Crop decline caused by soil borne fungal pathogens affects specialized cropping systems such as fruit trees and strawberry. A study was carried out to investigate the effectiveness of pre-plant application of waste-derived biomasses in strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) to reduce that phenomenon. A field experiment was carried out in an alpine strawberry specialized valley in South Tyrol (Italy), in a long term cultivated field selected for yield reduction over recent years. In July 2018, one month before strawberry transplanting, a field experiment with four soil treatments was set up: anaerobic digestate (solid fraction) of liquid manure, compost from anaerobic digestate of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW), untreated control and Dazomet as chemical control. Plants were grown for two cycles (2019 and 2020). Dazomet always gave a significant (over 50%) increase in marketable yield per plant in both the years, anaerobic digestates did not improve strawberry production; compost from OFMSW gave phytotoxic effects in the first year, but improved strawberry yield like Dazomet in the second. Changes of rhizosphere bacterial populations and difference in root pathogen abundance, especially that of Dactylonectria torresensis, were correlated to the crop response to treatments. Findings suggest that waste-derived biomasses are a promising eco-friendly option for counteracting strawberry yield decline. Their positive impact was mostly linked to functional improvements induced by microbial variations. However, the use of such organic amendment requires careful evaluation of composition, doses and above all application times to reduce phytotoxic effects that in some cases can occur in the first months after application. View Full-Text
Keywords: root rot; soil borne pathogens; digestate; compost; Pseudomonas; Dactylonectria torresensis; crop decline root rot; soil borne pathogens; digestate; compost; Pseudomonas; Dactylonectria torresensis; crop decline
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MDPI and ACS Style

Soppelsa, S.; Manici, L.M.; Caputo, F.; Zago, M.; Kelderer, M. Locally Available Organic Waste for Counteracting Strawberry Decline in a Mountain Specialized Cropping Area. Sustainability 2021, 13, 3964. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13073964

AMA Style

Soppelsa S, Manici LM, Caputo F, Zago M, Kelderer M. Locally Available Organic Waste for Counteracting Strawberry Decline in a Mountain Specialized Cropping Area. Sustainability. 2021; 13(7):3964. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13073964

Chicago/Turabian Style

Soppelsa, Sebastian, Luisa M. Manici, Francesco Caputo, Massimo Zago, and Markus Kelderer. 2021. "Locally Available Organic Waste for Counteracting Strawberry Decline in a Mountain Specialized Cropping Area" Sustainability 13, no. 7: 3964. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13073964

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