Next Article in Journal
How Different Are the Nordics? Unravelling the Willingness to Make Economic Sacrifices for the Environment
Previous Article in Journal
Natural Assurance Schemes Canvas: A Framework to Develop Business Models for Nature-Based Solutions Aimed at Disaster Risk Reduction
Previous Article in Special Issue
Mulching Measures Improve Soil Moisture in Rain-Fed Jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill.) Orchards in the Loess Hilly Region of China
Open AccessArticle

Impacts of Relative Elevation on Soil Nutrients and Apple Quality in the Hilly-Gully Region of the Loess Plateau, China

by 1,2,3,4,5, 1,3,4,5,*, 3,4 and 6
1
Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Ministry of Water Resources, Yangling 712100, China
2
Department of Computer Science and Technology, Xi’an University of Science and Technology, Xi’an 710054, China
3
Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Northwest Agriculture & Forestry University, Yangling 712100, China
4
Research Center on Soil & Water Conservation, Ministry of Water Resources, Yangling 712100, China
5
College of Resources and Environment, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
6
Ansai District Bureau of Meteorology, Ansai 717400, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Xining Zhao
Sustainability 2021, 13(3), 1293; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13031293
Received: 2 December 2020 / Revised: 17 January 2021 / Accepted: 21 January 2021 / Published: 26 January 2021
Relative elevation, as one of the decisive factors to the redistribution of soil water, nutrients, sunshine, and temperature in a region influences apple yield and quality by adjusting soil water and nutrients. To explore the impact of relative elevation on apple quality, this research investigated the conditions of soil moisture and nutrients at different elevations of terrace apple orchards in the hilly-gully region of the Loess Plateau. The results showed that soil water content decreases when the elevation increased, whereas soil nutrients fluctuated significantly at different elevations of terrace orchards and the contents were lower than the standard level of the Loess Plateau, especially soil organic matter, but total potassium was higher. The apple firmness increased when the elevation increased and had a good linear relationship with elevation. Apple vitamin C content in weed-covered orchards was higher than in the ploughing and weeding management orchards. The impact of soil nutrients, including soil water, nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium on apple quality were concentrated in soluble solid and total acid. Irrational irrigation or partial use of nutrients, such as more use of nitrogen and less use of phosphorus and potassium, may deteriorate the apple quality. Therefore, we suggested that the amount of irrigation be increased appropriately with the raising of elevation. Moreover, part of the weed should be kept to cover the orchard, as well as mowing regularly and covering the surface. This would not only improve water use efficiency and increase soil organic matter content, it would also maintain apple quality and ensure sustainable development of the apple orchards. View Full-Text
Keywords: apple orchard; soil water and nutrients; fruit quality; arid and semi-arid area apple orchard; soil water and nutrients; fruit quality; arid and semi-arid area
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Hua, L.; Gao, J.; Zhou, M.; Bai, S. Impacts of Relative Elevation on Soil Nutrients and Apple Quality in the Hilly-Gully Region of the Loess Plateau, China. Sustainability 2021, 13, 1293. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13031293

AMA Style

Hua L, Gao J, Zhou M, Bai S. Impacts of Relative Elevation on Soil Nutrients and Apple Quality in the Hilly-Gully Region of the Loess Plateau, China. Sustainability. 2021; 13(3):1293. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13031293

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hua, Lei; Gao, Jianen; Zhou, Meifang; Bai, Shilun. 2021. "Impacts of Relative Elevation on Soil Nutrients and Apple Quality in the Hilly-Gully Region of the Loess Plateau, China" Sustainability 13, no. 3: 1293. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13031293

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop