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Article

Co-Creating Value in Sustainable and Alternative Food Networks: The Case of Community Supported Agriculture in New Zealand

1
EngageMinds HUB—Consumer, Food & Health Engagement Research Center, Faculty of Psychology, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore – Largo Agostino Gemelli, 1, 20123 Milano, Italy
2
School of Psychology, Massey University, 0745 Auckland, New Zealand
3
EngageMinds HUB—Consumer, Food & Health Engagement Research Center, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Agricultural, Nutrition and Environmental Sciences, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore – Milano and Piacenza-Cremona, Largo Agostino Gemelli, 1, 20123 Milano, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(3), 1252; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12031252
Received: 28 November 2019 / Revised: 10 January 2020 / Accepted: 12 January 2020 / Published: 10 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Patterns in Consumer Behavior)
Background: Over recent decades, society has been facing different social, political, and economic challenges that are changing classical consumption dynamics towards more sustainable practices, mostly in the field of food consumption. In particular, alternative food networks are enabling new food consumption models inspired by principles of participation and sustainability. The aim of this study was to explore how community supported agriculture farms create value for sustainability practices from both farmer and consumer perspectives in order to find new levers to engage consumers towards pursuing better food consumption models. Methods: A qualitative study was conducted following focused ethnography principles. Results: The results show that community supported agriculture is a complex concept based on the active participation of consumers as carers of economic, social, and environmental values. These values are all strongly connected, and together contribute to create an ecosystem where sustainable food practices can be promoted through a “learning by doing” process. Conclusions: This research offers new ways to re-connect and collaborate with consumers in the era of sustainable food consumption. View Full-Text
Keywords: consumer engagement; focused ethnography; alternative food network; new consumption models; community supported agriculture consumer engagement; focused ethnography; alternative food network; new consumption models; community supported agriculture
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MDPI and ACS Style

Savarese, M.; Chamberlain, K.; Graffigna, G. Co-Creating Value in Sustainable and Alternative Food Networks: The Case of Community Supported Agriculture in New Zealand. Sustainability 2020, 12, 1252. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12031252

AMA Style

Savarese M, Chamberlain K, Graffigna G. Co-Creating Value in Sustainable and Alternative Food Networks: The Case of Community Supported Agriculture in New Zealand. Sustainability. 2020; 12(3):1252. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12031252

Chicago/Turabian Style

Savarese, Mariarosaria, Kerry Chamberlain, and Guendalina Graffigna. 2020. "Co-Creating Value in Sustainable and Alternative Food Networks: The Case of Community Supported Agriculture in New Zealand" Sustainability 12, no. 3: 1252. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12031252

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