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Sustainability 2019, 11(4), 971; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11040971

Building Asset Value Mapping in Support of Flood Risk Assessments: A Case Study of Shanghai, China

1,2,*
,
1,2
,
1,2
and
3
1
State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology, Faculty of Geographical Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China
2
Key Laboratory of Environmental Change and Natural Disaster, MOE, Faculty of Geographical Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China
3
Department of Water & Climate Risk, Institute for Environmental Studies, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 9 January 2019 / Revised: 7 February 2019 / Accepted: 11 February 2019 / Published: 14 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Human Geography and Social Sustainability)
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Abstract

Exposure is an integral part of any natural disaster risk assessment, and damage to buildings is one of the most important consequence of flood disasters. As such, estimates of the building stock and the values at risk can assist in flood risk management, including determining the damage extent and severity. Unfortunately, little information about building asset value, and especially its spatial distributions, is readily available in most countries. This is certainly true in China, given that the statistical data on building floor area (BFA) is collected by administrative entities (i.e. census level). To bridge the gap between census-level BFA data and geo-coded building asset value data, this article introduces a method for building asset value mapping, using Shanghai as an example. This method consists of a census-level BFA disaggregation (downscaling) by means of a building footprint map extracted from high-resolution remote sensing data, combined with LandScan population density grid data and a financial appraisal of building asset values. Validation with statistical data and field survey data confirms that the method can produce good results, but largely constrained by the resolution of the population density grid used. However, compared with other models with no disaggregation in flood exposure assessment that involves Shanghai, the building asset value mapping method used in this study has a comparative advantage, and it will provide a quick way to produce a building asset value map for regional flood risk assessments. We argue that a sound flood risk assessment should be based on a high-resolution—individual building-based—building asset value map because of the high spatial heterogeneity of flood hazards. View Full-Text
Keywords: building asset value mapping; flood risk management; Shanghai; exposure building asset value mapping; flood risk management; Shanghai; exposure
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Wu, J.; Ye, M.; Wang, X.; Koks, E. Building Asset Value Mapping in Support of Flood Risk Assessments: A Case Study of Shanghai, China. Sustainability 2019, 11, 971.

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