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Open AccessArticle

Environmental Impact of Freight Signal Priority with Connected Trucks

1
Department of Civil Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju 61452, Korea
2
Center for Sustainable Mobility, Virginia Tech Transportation Institute, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA
3
The Charles E. Via, Jr. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Virginia Tech Transportation Institute, Blacksburg, VA 24060, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2019, 11(23), 6819; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11236819
Received: 25 September 2019 / Revised: 11 November 2019 / Accepted: 25 November 2019 / Published: 1 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue ICT and Sustainable Freight Logistics)
Traffic signal priority is an operational technique employed for the smooth progression of a specific type of vehicle at signalized intersections. Transit signal priority is the most common type of traffic signal priority, and it has been researched extensively. Conversely, the impacts of freight signal priority (FSP) has not been widely investigated. Hence, this study aims to evaluate the energy and environmental impacts of FSP under connected vehicle environment by utilizing a simulation testbed developed for the multi-modal intelligent transportation signal system. The simulation platform consists of VISSIM microscopic traffic simulation software, a signal request messages distributor program, an RSE module, and an Econolite ASC/3 traffic controller emulator. The MOVES model was employed to estimate the vehicle fuel consumption and emissions. The simulation study revealed that the implementation of FSP significantly reduced the fuel consumption and emissions of connected trucks and general passenger cars; the network-wide fuel consumption was reduced by 11.8%, and the CO2, HC, CO, and NOX emissions by 11.8%, 28.3%, 24.8%, and 25.9%, respectively. However, the fuel consumption and emissions of the side-street vehicles increased substantially due to the reduced green signal times on the side streets, especially in the high truck composition scenario. View Full-Text
Keywords: MMITSS; FSP; MOVES; environmental impacts; connected vehicles MMITSS; FSP; MOVES; environmental impacts; connected vehicles
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Park, S.; Ahn, K.; Rakha, H.A. Environmental Impact of Freight Signal Priority with Connected Trucks. Sustainability 2019, 11, 6819.

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