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Audiol. Res., Volume 14, Issue 4 (August 2024) – 9 articles

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9 pages, 239 KiB  
Article
The Impact of Serums Calcium 25-Hydroxy Vitamin D, Ferritin, Uric Acid, and Sleeping Disorders on Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo Patients
by Abdulbari Bener, Ahmet Erdoğan and Ünsal Veli Üstündağ
Audiol. Res. 2024, 14(4), 640-648; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres14040054 (registering DOI) - 16 Jul 2024
Viewed by 112
Abstract
Objective: This study’s objective was to identify the factors and impact of serums calcium 25-Hydroxy vitamin D, ferritin, uric acid, and sleeping disorders on benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) patients. Methods: This is a case and control design study. The consecutive patients’ visits [...] Read more.
Objective: This study’s objective was to identify the factors and impact of serums calcium 25-Hydroxy vitamin D, ferritin, uric acid, and sleeping disorders on benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) patients. Methods: This is a case and control design study. The consecutive patients’ visits (age, older than 25 years) with idiopathic BPPV were recruited in the present study. For each patient, 3:1 sex and age-matched healthy people were assigned as the control. The study comprised 177 patients with BPPV and 656 controls. The study included biochemical, clinical, physical examinations, PSQI sleep quality, supine roll test, and Dix–Hallpike test for the diagnosis of all patients, and pure-tone audiometry (PTA) was used to assess hearing. Univariate and multivariate stepwise regression analyses were used for statistical analysis. Results: The study comprised 833 patients with 295 males (35.4%) and 538 females (64.6%) who were between 25 and 70 years old. Of a total of 833 participants, 177 were BPPV patients, and 656 subject were normal. The results shown that there were significant differences between the BPPV and the normal group in terms of BMI (p = 0.039), physical activity (p = 0.003), cigarette smoking (p = 0.035), nargile-waterpipe use (p < 0.001), diabetes (p < 0.001), hypertension (p < 0.001), congestive heart failure (CHF) (p < 0.001), neurology (p < 0.001), tinnitus (p < 0.001), dizziness (p < 0.001), headache (p < 0.001), vitamin D (p = 0.004), calcium (p = 0.004), magnesium (p < 0.001), potassium (p = 0.019), phosphorus (p < 0.001), haemoglobin (p < 0.001), serum glucose (p < 0.001), HbA1c (p < 0.001), triglyceride (p < 0.001), systolic BP (p = 0.004), diastolic BP (p = 0.008), and microalbuminuria (p = 0.005); ATP III metabolic syndrome (p = 0.038), IDF metabolic syndrome (p = 0.034), and poor sleep (p = 0.033). In terms of the type of BPPV, the posterior canal was the most commonly affected (n = 126, 71.2%), followed by the horizontal (n = 43, 24.3%) and anterior canal (n = 8, 4.5%). The analysis indicated that serum ferritin (p < 0.001), uric acid (p < 0.001), blood pressure (p < 0.001), dizziness (p < 0.001), cigarette–water-pipe smokers (p = 0.004), headaches/migraines (p = 0.005), calcium (p = 0.007), vitamin D deficiency (p = 0.008), sleepiness (p = 0.016), physical activity (p = 0.022), CHF (p = 0.024), and tinnitus (p = 0.025) were considered as risk predictors for BPPV. Conclusions: The results revealed that the serum levels of vitamin D, ferritin, uric acid, and calcium are low among the study population and supplementation could be considered as prevention in BPPV patients. Full article
15 pages, 1231 KiB  
Article
Preliminary Validation of the Children’s Auditory Performance Scale (CHAPS) and the Auditory Processing Domain Questionnaire (APDQ) in Greek Cypriot Children
by Konstantinos Drosos, Dionysios Tafiadis, Louiza Voniati, Alexandra Papanicolaou and Chryssoula Thodi
Audiol. Res. 2024, 14(4), 625-639; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres14040053 (registering DOI) - 15 Jul 2024
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Abstract
Background: Identification of auditory processing disorders is achieved using questionnaires along with linguistic, non-linguistic, and auditory processing tests. Notably, the questionnaires “Children’s Auditory Performance Scale” (CHAPS) and “Auditory Processing Domain Questionnaire” (APDQ) are widely recognized and used. The current study investigated the psychometric [...] Read more.
Background: Identification of auditory processing disorders is achieved using questionnaires along with linguistic, non-linguistic, and auditory processing tests. Notably, the questionnaires “Children’s Auditory Performance Scale” (CHAPS) and “Auditory Processing Domain Questionnaire” (APDQ) are widely recognized and used. The current study investigated the psychometric properties of the CHAPS and APDQ in Greek Cypriot children. Methods: The CHAPS and APDQ questionnaires were completed by parents of 40 Greek Cypriot children, 16 typically developing (TD) children, and 24 children with a history of Speech Sound Disorders (SSDs). Results: There were significant differences between the two groups on both questionnaires. Cronbach’s alpha was calculated at α = 0.922 for the CHAPS total score and α = 0.926 for the APDQ total score. The Receiver Operating Curve (ROC) analysis provided a cut-off point equal to −0.30 (AUC 0.849, p < 0.001) for CHAPS and a cut-off point equal to 90.00 (AUC 0.820, p < 0.001) for APDQ. Significant positive Spearman ρ correlations were observed between the CHAPS and APDQ (ρ = 0.639, p = 0.001). Conclusions: The CHAPS and APDQ can identify distinct auditory processing characteristics between in children with SSDs and TD children. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hearing Loss: Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment)
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14 pages, 586 KiB  
Study Protocol
Can Music Enhance Working Memory and Speech in Noise Perception in Cochlear Implant Users? Design Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Behavioral and Electrophysiological Study
by Kathrin Mertel, Andrew Dimitrijevic and Michael Thaut
Audiol. Res. 2024, 14(4), 611-624; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres14040052 - 6 Jul 2024
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Abstract
Background: A cochlear implant (CI) enables deaf people to understand speech but due to technical restrictions, users face great limitations in noisy conditions. Music training has been shown to augment shared auditory and cognitive neural networks for processing speech and music and to [...] Read more.
Background: A cochlear implant (CI) enables deaf people to understand speech but due to technical restrictions, users face great limitations in noisy conditions. Music training has been shown to augment shared auditory and cognitive neural networks for processing speech and music and to improve auditory–motor coupling, which benefits speech perception in noisy listening conditions. These are promising prerequisites for studying multi-modal neurologic music training (NMT) for speech-in-noise (SIN) perception in adult cochlear implant (CI) users. Furthermore, a better understanding of the neurophysiological correlates when performing working memory (WM) and SIN tasks after multi-modal music training with CI users may provide clinicians with a better understanding of optimal rehabilitation. Methods: Within 3 months, 81 post-lingual deafened adult CI recipients will undergo electrophysiological recordings and a four-week neurologic music therapy multi-modal training randomly assigned to one of three training focusses (pitch, rhythm, and timbre). Pre- and post-tests will analyze behavioral outcomes and apply a novel electrophysiological measurement approach that includes neural tracking to speech and alpha oscillation modulations to the sentence-final-word-identification-and-recall test (SWIR-EEG). Expected outcome: Short-term multi-modal music training will enhance WM and SIN performance in post-lingual deafened adult CI recipients and will be reflected in greater neural tracking and alpha oscillation modulations in prefrontal areas. Prospectively, outcomes could contribute to understanding the relationship between cognitive functioning and SIN besides the technical deficits of the CI. Targeted clinical application of music training for post-lingual deafened adult CI carriers to significantly improve SIN and positively impact the quality of life can be realized. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Music Perception in Cochlear Implant Recipients)
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9 pages, 3413 KiB  
Review
Focused Update on Clinical Testing of Otolith Organs
by Stefan C. A. Hegemann, Anand Kumar Bery and Amir Kheradmand
Audiol. Res. 2024, 14(4), 602-610; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres14040051 - 2 Jul 2024
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Abstract
Sensing gravity through the otolith receptors is crucial for bipedal stability and gait. The overall contribution of the otolith organs to eye movements, postural control, and perceptual functions is the basis for clinical testing of otolith function. With such a wide range of [...] Read more.
Sensing gravity through the otolith receptors is crucial for bipedal stability and gait. The overall contribution of the otolith organs to eye movements, postural control, and perceptual functions is the basis for clinical testing of otolith function. With such a wide range of contributions, it is important to recognize that the functional outcomes of these tests may vary depending on the specific method employed to stimulate the hair cells. In this article, we review common methods used for clinical evaluation of otolith function and discuss how different aspects of physiology may affect the functional measurements in these tests. We compare the properties and performance of various clinical tests with an emphasis on the newly developed video ocular counter roll (vOCR), measurement of ocular torsion on fundus photography, and subjective visual vertical or horizontal (SVV/SVH) testing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Vestibular System: Physiology and Testing Methods)
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9 pages, 222 KiB  
Review
Insidious Cases of Enlarged Vestibular Aqueduct (EVA) Syndrome Resembling Otosclerosis: Clinical Features for Differential Diagnosis and the Role of High-Resolution Computed Tomography in the Pre-Operative Setting
by Giovanni Motta, Salvatore Allosso, Ludovica Castagna, Ghita Trifuoggi, Tonia Di Meglio, Domenico Testa, Massimo Mesolella and Gaetano Motta
Audiol. Res. 2024, 14(4), 593-601; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres14040050 (registering DOI) - 27 Jun 2024
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Abstract
Background: Enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA) syndrome can mimic otosclerosis in adults, presenting with an air–bone gap (ABG) and even absent stapedial reflexes. The ABG in inner-ear disorders is currently the object of several authors’ studies and seems to be related to a third [...] Read more.
Background: Enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA) syndrome can mimic otosclerosis in adults, presenting with an air–bone gap (ABG) and even absent stapedial reflexes. The ABG in inner-ear disorders is currently the object of several authors’ studies and seems to be related to a third mobile window (TMW) phenomenon. This can lead to misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment. Given that it would be inappropriate and harmful to perform CT scans in all patients with a clinical diagnosis of otosclerosis, this study aims to highlight some clinical features useful for the differential diagnosis between otosclerosis and these rare cases of EVA presenting with an ABG, thus enabling the identification of suspected cases to be tested with CT scans. Methods: Between April and May 2024, a narrative review was conducted focusing on the differential diagnosis between some rare cases of EVA and otosclerosis. Clinical, audiological, and radiologic features of both conditions were investigated. Results: This review demonstrates the diagnostic challenge in differentiating atypical cases of EVA from otosclerosis in a subset of patients. Clinical and audiological features are important for differential diagnosis, but may not always be sufficient. Therefore, high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) of the temporal bone plays a pivotal role in definitive diagnosis. Conclusions: In some specific cases, pre-operative imaging assessment using HRCT emerges as an essential tool for differentiating these two conditions and avoiding unnecessary stapes surgery. Full article
12 pages, 2210 KiB  
Article
Electric Auditory Brainstem Response Audiometry in Cochlear Implants: New Recording Paradigm
by Takwa Gabr, Hossam Debis and Ahmed Hafez
Audiol. Res. 2024, 14(4), 581-592; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres14040049 - 26 Jun 2024
Viewed by 651
Abstract
(1) Background: Cochlear implants (CIs) are widely applied to recover audition for patients with severe degrees of or total hearing loss. Electrical stimulation using the electrically evoked ABR (E-ABR) can be recorded in CI recipients through the device. This work was designed to [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Cochlear implants (CIs) are widely applied to recover audition for patients with severe degrees of or total hearing loss. Electrical stimulation using the electrically evoked ABR (E-ABR) can be recorded in CI recipients through the device. This work was designed to study E-ABR recorded individually from different channels located at the apical, middle, and basal cochlear regions in comparison to their simultaneous separated or adjacent combined recordings. (2) Methods: This study included 17 children fitted with unilateral cochlear implants. All children were subjected to impedance measurement, electrical compound action potentials (ECAP), and E-ABR recording of three channels located at the apical, middle, and basal cochlear regions. This was followed by simultaneous E-ABR recording of the three “separated” channels in comparison to E-ABR recording from three adjacent channels located at the middle cochlear region. (3) Results: Similar E-ABR latencies and amplitudes were found using either individual or simultaneously separated or adjacent combined recording. However, the mean amplitude measures of E-ABR for combined adjacent channels showed a positive correlation with the applied current level. (4) Conclusions: Combined E-ABR recording from adjacent channels is a faster and more reliable technique that can be used effectively without compromising the results of the recorded E-ABR. Full article
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9 pages, 872 KiB  
Article
Postural Stability of Adolescents with Late Cochlear Implantation and Hearing Aids: A Non-Randomized Trial
by Anna Zwierzchowska, Eliza Gaweł, Agata Krużyńska, Kajetan J. Słomka, Aleksandra Żebrowska and Grzegorz Juras
Audiol. Res. 2024, 14(4), 572-580; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres14040048 - 25 Jun 2024
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Abstract
Background: The aim of this study was to assess the neuromuscular control of adolescents with late unilateral cochlear implantation and compare them to adolescents with hearing aids (HAs) while performing a balance task on a platform with the conditions of an activated hearing [...] Read more.
Background: The aim of this study was to assess the neuromuscular control of adolescents with late unilateral cochlear implantation and compare them to adolescents with hearing aids (HAs) while performing a balance task on a platform with the conditions of an activated hearing device (cochlear implant (CI)/HAs) with eyes opened/closed (EO/EC). Methods: Forty-eight adolescents with hearing loss participated in the study and were divided into SG (unilateral CI and HA) and CG (bilateral HA). The evaluation of the postural stability was performed with a force plate during two repeating testing trials with EO/EC. Results: SG was characterized by greater values of vCOP compared to CG (EO), while, in CG, greater values of vCOP were noted in the second trial. The type of hearing device was found to be related to the values of area (EO) (p < 0.001), which were always greater in SG, regardless of the visual perception. Conclusions: Late unilateral CI may impact the activation of different models of the auditory compensatory mechanism than HA, which is related to neuromuscular control. The values of vCOP can be predicted by age in late-CI individuals. Visual perception seems not to be related to the values of the area, which can be impacted both by CI and HA. Full article
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10 pages, 1884 KiB  
Article
Visual Fixation of Skull-Vibration-Induced Nystagmus in Patients with Peripheral Vestibulopathy
by Melissa Blanco, Chiara Monopoli-Roca, Marta Álvarez de Linera-Alperi, Pablo Menéndez Fernández-Miranda, Bárbara Molina, Angel Batuecas-Caletrío and Nicolás Pérez-Fernández
Audiol. Res. 2024, 14(4), 562-571; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres14040047 - 24 Jun 2024
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Abstract
Nystagmus induced by applying an intense vibratory stimulus to the skull (SVIN) indicates vestibular functional asymmetry. In unilateral vestibular loss, a 100 Hz bone-conducted vibration given to either mastoid immediately causes a primarily horizontal nystagmus. The test is performed in darkness to avoid [...] Read more.
Nystagmus induced by applying an intense vibratory stimulus to the skull (SVIN) indicates vestibular functional asymmetry. In unilateral vestibular loss, a 100 Hz bone-conducted vibration given to either mastoid immediately causes a primarily horizontal nystagmus. The test is performed in darkness to avoid visual fixation (VF) but there are no data about how much VF affects the often-intense SVIN. The aim is to analyze the amount of reduction in SVIN when VF is allowed during testing. Thus, all patients seen in a tertiary hospital for vertigo or dizziness with positive SVIN were included. SVIN was recorded for 10 s for each condition: without VF (aSVINwo) and with VF (aSVINw). We obtained an aSVINwo and an aSVINw as average slow-phase velocities (SPV) without and with VF. VF index (FISVIN) was calculated as the ratio of SPV. Among the 124 patients included, spontaneous nystagmus (SN) was found in 25% and the median slow phase velocity (mSPV) (without VF) of SN was 2.6 ± 2.4°/s. Mean FISVIN was 0.27 ± 0.29. FISVIN was 0 in 42 patients, and FISVIN between 0 and 1 was found in 82 (mean FISVIN 0.39 ± 0.02). Fixation suppression was found in all patients with SVIN in cases of peripheral vestibulopathy. FISVIN clearly delineates two populations of patients: with or without a complete visual reduction in nystagmus. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Vestibular System: Physiology and Testing Methods)
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8 pages, 237 KiB  
Article
The Efficacy of Wireless Auditory Training in Unilateral Hearing Loss Rehabilitation
by Andrea Lovato, Daniele Monzani, Ylenia Kambo, Leonardo Franz, Andrea Frosolini and Cosimo De Filippis
Audiol. Res. 2024, 14(4), 554-561; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres14040046 - 24 Jun 2024
Viewed by 534
Abstract
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of auditory training (AT) in patients with unilateral hearing loss (UHL) using hearing aids (HAs), comparing traditional methods with a new approach involving a wireless remote microphone. Methods: The study included 96 [...] Read more.
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of auditory training (AT) in patients with unilateral hearing loss (UHL) using hearing aids (HAs), comparing traditional methods with a new approach involving a wireless remote microphone. Methods: The study included 96 participants, divided into two groups, with ages ranging from 42 to 64 years, comprising both male and female subjects. A clinical trial including consecutive moderate UHL patients was performed at our institution. For the study group, a Roger Pen was used during AT with patients inside a sound-attenuating cabin. Controls followed conventional sessions. Professional speech and language pathologists performed the rehabilitation. Audiological outcomes were measured, including word recognition at signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of 0 dB, +5 dB, and +10 dB, to determine the effectiveness of the training. Measurements also included the Speech, Spatial, and Qualities of Hearing Scale to assess perceived auditory abilities. Results: A total of 46 and 50 UHL patients were randomly included in the study and control groups, respectively. No differences were found in terms of sex, age, presence of tinnitus, duration of hearing loss, pure tone average, and speech-in-noise perception without an HA. Following HA fitting and AT, a notable enhancement in the ability to identify speech in noisy environments was observed in the study group. This improvement was significant at SNRs of +5 and +10. When comparing the ability to identify speech in noise using HAs across both groups, it was observed that hearing capabilities post-wireless AT showed a significant improvement at an SNR of +5. Only the study group had a significant improvement in the total Speech, Spatial, and Qualities of Hearing Scale score after the training. Conclusions: In our group of UHL patients, we found significantly better speech-in-noise perception when HA fitting was followed by wireless AT. Wireless AT may facilitate usage of HAs, leading to binaural hearing in UHL patients. Our findings suggest that future interventions might benefit from incorporating wireless technology in AT programs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rehabilitation of Hearing Impairment: 2nd Edition)
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