Rehabilitation of Hearing Impairment: 2nd Edition

A special issue of Audiology Research (ISSN 2039-4349).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 2264

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Guest Editor
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology/Division of Ear, Nose and Throat Diseases, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, SE-141 86 Stockholm, Sweden
Interests: hearing disorders; audiology; deafness; hearing loss; ENT
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recently a 1st Edition of Rehabilitation of Hearing Impairment was completed. The interest of this research area was amazing and resulted in eleven high-quality scientific reports on this important subject. New knowledge emerged e.g., showing that individualized treatment plans and timely re-evaluations are crucial for an efficient audiological rehabilitation. Another study on patients aged 85 showed that the CI positively affected their well-being.

Against the positive response on the field of rehabilitation of hearing impairment we are now inviting to a 2nd edition.

The prevalence of hearing impairment is increasing and at present is the third leading cause of years lived with disability, well exceeding diseases such as diabetes and depressive disorders. A recent report – a systematic and meta-analysis study - from Univ of South Carolina concludes that unsafe recreational listening practices in adolescence and youngsters are highly prevalent worldwide and may place over 1 billion young people at risk of hearing loss. Here we have to attack not only improved rehabilitation but also issues of prevention.

Many questions concerning hearing impairment and rehabilitation remain to be answered. Recent work has suggested an association between hearing loss and cognitive functioning. Mechanisms underlying this association are still unclear though evidence indicates higher-order central processing to affect auditory abilities. Importantly, studies suggest that rehabilitation of the hearing loss may have an impact on cognitive outcomes/central functioning.

Another area under development is new molecular therapies for treatment of hearing loss.  Potential for repair and regeneration in the cochlea by use new biomaterials, gene therapy technologies, cell therapy and the use of the cochlear implant as a vehicle for drug delivery is challenging..

The aim of the present 2nd Special Issue on “Rehabilitation of Hearing Impairment” is to elaborate on today’s evidence-based knowledge on aural rehabilitation, to provide an update on technical rehabilitation by hearing aids, bone conduction devices and cochlear implants and to highlight aspects of psychosocial rehabilitation of hearing impairment related to severity, age, gender, mental fatigue, comorbidity, rehabilitation at distance, cognition, but also molecular therapies etc.  We are greatly looking forward to and encourage submissions aiming to shed light on these meaningful aspects.

Prof. Dr. Sten Hellström
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • sensorineural hearing loss
  • rehabilitation
  • communication strategies
  • auditory training
  • cognition
  • hearing aids
  • cochlear implants
  • assistive listening devices
  • molecular therapies

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

8 pages, 237 KiB  
Article
The Efficacy of Wireless Auditory Training in Unilateral Hearing Loss Rehabilitation
by Andrea Lovato, Daniele Monzani, Ylenia Kambo, Leonardo Franz, Andrea Frosolini and Cosimo De Filippis
Audiol. Res. 2024, 14(4), 554-561; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres14040046 - 24 Jun 2024
Viewed by 335
Abstract
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of auditory training (AT) in patients with unilateral hearing loss (UHL) using hearing aids (HAs), comparing traditional methods with a new approach involving a wireless remote microphone. Methods: The study included 96 [...] Read more.
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of auditory training (AT) in patients with unilateral hearing loss (UHL) using hearing aids (HAs), comparing traditional methods with a new approach involving a wireless remote microphone. Methods: The study included 96 participants, divided into two groups, with ages ranging from 42 to 64 years, comprising both male and female subjects. A clinical trial including consecutive moderate UHL patients was performed at our institution. For the study group, a Roger Pen was used during AT with patients inside a sound-attenuating cabin. Controls followed conventional sessions. Professional speech and language pathologists performed the rehabilitation. Audiological outcomes were measured, including word recognition at signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of 0 dB, +5 dB, and +10 dB, to determine the effectiveness of the training. Measurements also included the Speech, Spatial, and Qualities of Hearing Scale to assess perceived auditory abilities. Results: A total of 46 and 50 UHL patients were randomly included in the study and control groups, respectively. No differences were found in terms of sex, age, presence of tinnitus, duration of hearing loss, pure tone average, and speech-in-noise perception without an HA. Following HA fitting and AT, a notable enhancement in the ability to identify speech in noisy environments was observed in the study group. This improvement was significant at SNRs of +5 and +10. When comparing the ability to identify speech in noise using HAs across both groups, it was observed that hearing capabilities post-wireless AT showed a significant improvement at an SNR of +5. Only the study group had a significant improvement in the total Speech, Spatial, and Qualities of Hearing Scale score after the training. Conclusions: In our group of UHL patients, we found significantly better speech-in-noise perception when HA fitting was followed by wireless AT. Wireless AT may facilitate usage of HAs, leading to binaural hearing in UHL patients. Our findings suggest that future interventions might benefit from incorporating wireless technology in AT programs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rehabilitation of Hearing Impairment: 2nd Edition)
12 pages, 1147 KiB  
Article
Hebrew Digits in Noise (DIN) Test in Cochlear Implant Users and Normal Hearing Listeners
by Riki Taitelbaum-Swead and Leah Fostick
Audiol. Res. 2024, 14(3), 457-468; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres14030038 - 20 May 2024
Viewed by 355
Abstract
This study aimed to compare the Hebrew version of the digits-in-noise (DIN) thresholds among cochlear implant (CI) users and their normal-hearing (NH) counterparts, explore the influence of age on these thresholds, examine the effects of early auditory exposure versus its absence on DIN [...] Read more.
This study aimed to compare the Hebrew version of the digits-in-noise (DIN) thresholds among cochlear implant (CI) users and their normal-hearing (NH) counterparts, explore the influence of age on these thresholds, examine the effects of early auditory exposure versus its absence on DIN threshold, and assess the correlation between DIN thresholds and other speech perception tests. A total of 13 children with CI (aged 5.5–11 years), 15 pre-lingual CI users (aged 14–30 years), and 15 post-lingual CI users (aged 22–77 years), and their age-matched NH controls (n = 45) participated in the study. Speech perception tasks, including the DIN test, one-syllable word test, and sentence identification tasks in various auditory conditions, served as the main outcome measures. The results indicated that CI users exhibited higher speech reception thresholds in noise across all age groups compared to NH peers, with no significant difference between pre-lingual and post-lingual CI users. Significant differences were also observed in monosyllabic word and sentence accuracy in both quiet and noise conditions between CI and NH groups. Furthermore, correlations were observed between the DIN and other speech perception tests. The study concludes that CI users require a notably higher signal-to-noise ratio to discern digits in noise, underscoring the DIN test’s utility in assessing speech recognition capabilities in CI users while emphasizing the need for a comprehensive test battery to fully gauge their speech perception abilities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rehabilitation of Hearing Impairment: 2nd Edition)
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16 pages, 936 KiB  
Article
Development of New Open-Set Speech Material for Use in Clinical Audiology with Speakers of British English
by Mahmoud Keshavarzi, Marina Salorio-Corbetto, Tobias Reichenbach, Josephine Marriage and Brian C. J. Moore
Audiol. Res. 2024, 14(2), 264-279; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres14020024 - 26 Feb 2024
Viewed by 985
Abstract
Background: The Chear open-set performance test (COPT), which uses a carrier phrase followed by a monosyllabic test word, is intended for clinical assessment of speech recognition, evaluation of hearing-device performance, and the fine-tuning of hearing devices for speakers of British English. This paper [...] Read more.
Background: The Chear open-set performance test (COPT), which uses a carrier phrase followed by a monosyllabic test word, is intended for clinical assessment of speech recognition, evaluation of hearing-device performance, and the fine-tuning of hearing devices for speakers of British English. This paper assesses practice effects, test–retest reliability, and the variability across lists of the COPT. Method: In experiment 1, 16 normal-hearing participants were tested using an initial version of the COPT, at three speech-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Experiment 2 used revised COPT lists, with items swapped between lists to reduce differences in difficulty across lists. In experiment 3, test–retest repeatability was assessed for stimuli presented in quiet, using 15 participants with sensorineural hearing loss. Results: After administration of a single practice list, no practice effects were evident. The critical difference between scores for two lists was about 2 words (out of 15) or 5 phonemes (out of 50). The mean estimated SNR required for 74% words correct was −0.56 dB, with a standard deviation across lists of 0.16 dB. For the participants with hearing loss tested in quiet, the critical difference between scores for two lists was about 3 words (out of 15) or 6 phonemes (out of 50). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rehabilitation of Hearing Impairment: 2nd Edition)
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