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Audiol. Res., Volume 13, Issue 1 (February 2023) – 15 articles

Cover Story (view full-size image): To investigate the impact of a hearing dog in the life of people with hearing loss, three adults were interviewed. Specific aspects of hearing dogs appear to be associated with increased autonomy and a sense of security. The dog–owner pairing, the outstanding training, and the companion role of the dog were identified as the main elements supporting the high satisfaction reported by all participants. However, challenges for owners were identified in the context of Quebec, Canada, where there is an assumed lack of visibility of hearing dogs as a rehabilitation means. The association between owning a hearing dog and improved overall wellbeing suggests that this form of rehabilitation should be considered a pertinent option by hearing health professionals. View this paper
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9 pages, 260 KiB  
Essay
Socio-Economic Status and Language Development in Hearing Loss: A Critical Appraisal
by Paris Binos, Theodora Papastefanou and George Psillas
Audiol. Res. 2023, 13(1), 151-159; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres13010015 - 14 Feb 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2431
Abstract
The impact of language input on children’s speech, language, and brain development was borne out of Hart and Risley’s famous “30-million-word gap”. A perspective bolstered by many studies in the last decade relates higher socio-economic status (SES) to better qualitative and quantitative differences [...] Read more.
The impact of language input on children’s speech, language, and brain development was borne out of Hart and Risley’s famous “30-million-word gap”. A perspective bolstered by many studies in the last decade relates higher socio-economic status (SES) to better qualitative and quantitative differences in children’s speech. The logic chains found in these studies suggest that literacy development depends on language and brain development. Thus, brain building develops based on environmental experience and language input depends on the brain’s perception of the auditory information. This essay uses the latest published peer-reviewed research to outline the current landscape of the role of SES in the development of speech and language skills among children with hearing loss (HL) who are enrolled in auditory-driven habilitation programs. This essay argues that low SES families may provide sufficient input for their children. The outcome of auditory-driven programs implemented by speech-language pathologists (SLPs) seems to be detached from SES. The role of SES on this developmental trajectory remains unclear, and clinical practice may be related to other validated and robust parameters related to hearing loss. Full article
8 pages, 5344 KiB  
Article
Comparison of Speech, Spatial, and Qualities of Hearing Scale (SSQ) and the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB) Questionnaires in a Large Cohort of Self-Reported Normal-Hearing Adult Listeners
by Nirmal Srinivasan and Sadie O’Neill
Audiol. Res. 2023, 13(1), 143-150; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres13010014 - 10 Feb 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1825
Abstract
The Speech, Spatial, and Qualities of Hearing Scale (SSQ) and the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB) are two most commonly used questionnaires in the audiology clinic to assess an individual’s self-perception of their hearing ability. Here, we present the outcomes of [...] Read more.
The Speech, Spatial, and Qualities of Hearing Scale (SSQ) and the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB) are two most commonly used questionnaires in the audiology clinic to assess an individual’s self-perception of their hearing ability. Here, we present the outcomes of these two questionnaires on a large group of self-reported normal hearing adult listeners. A total of 254 self-reported normal-hearing younger and older adults completed the SSQ and the APHAB questionnaire. The younger participants completed the questionnaires through Qualtrics, whereas the older participants completed the questionnaire through Qualtrics and a traditional pen-and-paper method. The younger listeners perceived a higher ability compared to the older adults in all the SSQ subscales (Speech, Spatial, and Qualities) and reported a lesser frequency of the problems in three of the four APHAB subscales (Ease of communication, Reverberation, and Background Noise). There was no significant difference in the frequency of the problems reported in the Aversiveness subscale. Self-reported normal-hearing listeners do not rate their listening ability at the top of the ability scale. Additionally, the large dataset presented here has a potential normative value for the SSQ and the APHAB questionnaires for self-reported normal-hearing adult listeners. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rehabilitation of Hearing Impairment)
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13 pages, 593 KiB  
Article
Vestibular Loss in Children Affected by LVAS and IP2 Malformation and Operated with Cochlear Implant
by Åsa Bonnard, Eva Karltorp and Luca Verrecchia
Audiol. Res. 2023, 13(1), 130-142; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres13010013 - 09 Feb 2023
Viewed by 1350
Abstract
This is a single center cohort study regarding the prevalence of vestibular loss in hearing impaired children affected by large vestibular aqueduct syndrome (LVAS) with incomplete cochlear partition malformation type II (IP2), fitted with cochlear implant (CI). Twenty-seven children received CI operations at [...] Read more.
This is a single center cohort study regarding the prevalence of vestibular loss in hearing impaired children affected by large vestibular aqueduct syndrome (LVAS) with incomplete cochlear partition malformation type II (IP2), fitted with cochlear implant (CI). Twenty-seven children received CI operations at 0.4–13 years on one or both ears and tested for vestibular loss with head impulse test, video head impulse test, mini ice-water test and cervical VEMP. Vestibular loss was found in 19% of operated ears and in 13.9% of non-operated ears. The difference was not statistically significant and was not significantly modified by age at implantation, age at testing, sex, presence of SLC26A4 gene mutation or bilaterality. However, the presence of anatomic anomalies at the level of the vestibulum or semicircular canals was significantly associated with a higher incidence of vestibular loss in CI operated children but not in those non-operated. No other factors, such as the surgical access, the electrode type, the presence of Gusher perioperatively, or post-operative vertigo modified significantly the prevalence of vestibular loss. In conclusion, LVAS/IP2 appears to be the major determinant of vestibular loss in these children, with a less obvious impact of CI, excluding the cases with vestibulum/canal anomalies: this group might have a higher risk for vestibular loss after CI surgery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inner Ear Conductive Hearing Loss: Current Studies and Controversies)
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14 pages, 536 KiB  
Review
How Cochlear Implant Rehabilitation Impacts the Therapeutic Strategy for Vestibular Schwannoma
by Francesco P. Iannacone, Francesca Visconti and Elisabetta Zanoletti
Audiol. Res. 2023, 13(1), 116-129; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres13010012 - 08 Feb 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1853
Abstract
Background: Since both surgery and more conservative treatments show long-term outcomes in patients with VS, the current challenge in its therapeutic strategy is to offer a cure with lower functional morbidity in terms of facial and hearing preservation or the possibility of hearing [...] Read more.
Background: Since both surgery and more conservative treatments show long-term outcomes in patients with VS, the current challenge in its therapeutic strategy is to offer a cure with lower functional morbidity in terms of facial and hearing preservation or the possibility of hearing rehabilitation with a cochlear implant. Methods: PubMed and Scopus databases were searched from 2017 to November 2022. Fifteen articles met our selection criteria: (1) patients with a diagnosis of VS, either sporadic or NF2-related; (2) simultaneous or sequential cochlear implantation; (3) specified audiological test results and follow-up timing. Conclusions: Although the level of evidence for the presently included studies is low due to either the study design or the lack of treatment consensus, CI rehabilitation is a promising option, especially in small VS with compromised hearing and as a salvage option after a failed attempt at hearing preservation surgery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hearing and Balance in Acoustic Neuroma)
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9 pages, 987 KiB  
Article
Prevalence of Congenital Infections in Newborns and Universal Neonatal Hearing Screening in Santa Catarina, Brazil
by Eduarda Besen, Karina Mary Paiva, Luciana Berwanger Cigana, Marcos José Machado, Alessandra Giannella Samelli and Patrícia Haas
Audiol. Res. 2023, 13(1), 107-115; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres13010011 - 27 Jan 2023
Viewed by 1512
Abstract
Objective: to verify the frequency of congenital infections in newborns and their possible associations with the universal-neonatal-hearing-screening (UNHS) results, and evaluate a reference UNHS service in the Unified Health System (Sistema Único de Saúde—SUS), according to quality indicators. Methods: Historical cohort [...] Read more.
Objective: to verify the frequency of congenital infections in newborns and their possible associations with the universal-neonatal-hearing-screening (UNHS) results, and evaluate a reference UNHS service in the Unified Health System (Sistema Único de Saúde—SUS), according to quality indicators. Methods: Historical cohort study with data analysis of newborns attending prestigious hearing-health SUS services from January 2017 to December 2021, in Santa Catarina, Brazil. The quality of screening coverage was assessed based on the quality indicators proposed by the Brazilian neonatal-hearing-screening-care guidelines (Diretrizes de Atenção da Triagem Auditiva Neonatal—DATAN). Logistic-regression analysis, crude OR calculations, Cochran–Mantel–Haenszel OR calculation, and chi-square test were performed to estimate the association between risk indicators for hearing loss and UNHS failure. Results: In the last five years, the prestigious services performed UNHS on 34,801 newborns and met the DATAN quality indicators. Congenital syphilis was the most frequent (1.59%) congenital infection in newborns, followed by HIV (0.87%), whereas the least frequent was rubella (0.029%). Conclusion: Prestigious UNHS services reached ≥95% hearing screening coverage. Considering all congenital infections, the prevalence was 2.87%, with congenital syphilis the most frequent. Newborns with congenital syphilis or HIV are more likely to fail UNHS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Auditory Disorders: Incidence, Intervention and Treatment)
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11 pages, 2251 KiB  
Article
Do Patients Aged 85 Years and above Benefit from Their Cochlear Implants?
by Karin Hallin, Ulrika Larsson and Nadine Schart-Morén
Audiol. Res. 2023, 13(1), 96-106; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres13010010 - 19 Jan 2023
Viewed by 3237
Abstract
The present study aims to investigate the usage and benefits of cochlear implants (CIs) in elderly patients aged ≥85 years, including their device-handling issues, follow-ups, and the influence on their well-being. The patients answered one questionnaire regarding quality of life, EQ5D-3L, and one [...] Read more.
The present study aims to investigate the usage and benefits of cochlear implants (CIs) in elderly patients aged ≥85 years, including their device-handling issues, follow-ups, and the influence on their well-being. The patients answered one questionnaire regarding quality of life, EQ5D-3L, and one questionnaire, obtained from the Swedish CI quality register, regarding usage, handling, satisfaction, remaining difficulties, etc. The medical records were searched for the implantation date, implant model, speech processor model, monosyllabic (MS) word scores, infections over the implant, and compliance regarding scheduled visits to the clinic. The results show that most elderly patients are satisfied full-time users of their implants. Even though most patients had no problems handling their CI, handling issues must be considered. Recurring guidance and training on device operation are needed. We suggest that follow-up visits are essentially needed for this group of patients on a regular basis. CI surgery is considered a safe treatment, even for the elderly. Upgrads to new external equipment (e.g., sound processors) should not be excluded because of their age. The results suggested that the CI positively affected their well-being. This study was approved by the Swedish Ethical Review Authority (5/10-2021, Dnr: 2021-04970). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rehabilitation of Hearing Impairment)
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2 pages, 150 KiB  
Editorial
Acknowledgment to the Reviewers of Audiology Research in 2022
by Audiology Research Editorial Office
Audiol. Res. 2023, 13(1), 94-95; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres13010009 - 19 Jan 2023
Viewed by 907
Abstract
High-quality academic publishing is built on rigorous peer review [...] Full article
8 pages, 244 KiB  
Article
Facial Palsy Secondary to Cholesteatoma: A Case-Series of 14 Patients
by George Psillas and Jiannis Constantinidis
Audiol. Res. 2023, 13(1), 86-93; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres13010008 - 15 Jan 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1809
Abstract
Background: To evaluate patients with middle ear cholesteatoma presenting with facial palsy (FP). Material-Methods: A total of 14 subjects (10 males and 4 females), with a mean age of 42.5 years, were included in our study. The majority of patients presented with incomplete [...] Read more.
Background: To evaluate patients with middle ear cholesteatoma presenting with facial palsy (FP). Material-Methods: A total of 14 subjects (10 males and 4 females), with a mean age of 42.5 years, were included in our study. The majority of patients presented with incomplete FP (House–Brackmann HB II-IV, 11 cases) and the remaining 3 patients had complete facial paralysis (HB V-VI). A canal wall down mastoidectomy was performed in all the patients, followed by partial facial nerve decompression. Results: At the one-year follow-up, eleven (78.5%) patients demonstrated satisfactory recovery to HB I-II. Facial function recovered to HB grade I-II in 9 (100%) patients who were surgically treated within one month, and in 2 (40%) patients who underwent surgery after one month. The tympanic segment of facial nerve was the most common site of involvement (8 patients). The multiple regression analysis showed that a higher preoperative HB grade combined with a gradual than sudden onset of FP more likely resulted in worse postoperative HB grade. Conclusion: Early surgical removal of cholesteatoma associated with FP is more likely to result in good facial nerve recovery (78.5% of cases), when it is performed within one month from the onset of FP. According to the literature, the tympanic segment of the facial nerve was more frequently damaged (77.7%), followed by the mastoid segment (22.9%), labyrinthine segment (11.1%), and geniculate ganglion (11.1%). Labyrinthine fistula, mainly of the lateral semicircular canal, can be expected in cases of facial nerve dehiscence. The canal wall down mastoidectomy combined with partial decompression surgery was the most preferred surgical treatment for the FP secondary to cholesteatoma. Full article
10 pages, 563 KiB  
Review
Efferent Control in Musicians: A Review
by Francisca Acuña, Rodrigo Jeria, Elisabeth Pavez and Enzo Aguilar-Vidal
Audiol. Res. 2023, 13(1), 76-85; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres13010007 - 06 Jan 2023
Viewed by 1260
Abstract
It is widely established that musicians possess a higher level in certain auditory perceptual abilities when compared to non-musicians. This improvement may be mediated, at least in part, by changes in the cochlear response induced by reflex activation of the olivocochlear efferent system. [...] Read more.
It is widely established that musicians possess a higher level in certain auditory perceptual abilities when compared to non-musicians. This improvement may be mediated, at least in part, by changes in the cochlear response induced by reflex activation of the olivocochlear efferent system. In this review, we describe and analyze the scientific evidence regarding possible differences in the efferent response in musicians and non-musicians. The main evidence observed is that musicians present a greater robustness of the efferent olivocochlear reflex when measured by suppression of otoacoustic emissions and compared to non-musicians. Analyzing the articles presented in this review, it is possible to point out that the differential role of the efferent effect in musicians is not yet established. There is not enough evidence to support the idea that the olivocochlear system favors comparative changes in the properties of musicians’ auditory filters. New studies with psychoacoustic techniques, among others, are needed to measure the effect of the olivocochlear reflex on tuning, gain, compression, or temporal resolution in musicians and non-musicians. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Music Perception in Cochlear Implant Recipients)
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12 pages, 282 KiB  
Article
The Role and Relevance of Hearing Dogs from the Owner’s Perspective: An Explorative Study among Adults with Hearing Loss
by Audrey Lalancette, Marie-Alycia Tremblay and Mathieu Hotton
Audiol. Res. 2023, 13(1), 64-75; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres13010006 - 05 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2042
Abstract
This study aimed to explore perceptions and experiences about how owning a hearing dog can influence the functioning and the autonomy of people with hearing loss. Three adults participated in a semi-structured interview. The interviews were video recorded, transcribed, and coded. A procedure [...] Read more.
This study aimed to explore perceptions and experiences about how owning a hearing dog can influence the functioning and the autonomy of people with hearing loss. Three adults participated in a semi-structured interview. The interviews were video recorded, transcribed, and coded. A procedure combining qualitative content analysis and interpretative phenomenological analysis was used. The study shows how specific aspects of hearing dogs are associated with increased autonomy and sense of security among owners. The attentive dog-owner pairing, the outstanding training and the companion role of the hearing dog are the main elements supporting the high satisfaction related by all the participants. In regard of the location context (Quebec, Canada), ongoing challenges for owners are reflected in the lack of visibility of this rehabilitation means and its poor recognition from the society, resulting in the constant burden to explain the dog’s work to others. For adults with hearing loss, the hearing dog is a relevant way of offering both the benefits of functional assistance and the psychosocial support of a pet. The association between owning a hearing dog and improved overall well-being suggests that this form of rehabilitation should be considered as a pertinent option by hearing health professionals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rehabilitation of Hearing Impairment)
15 pages, 546 KiB  
Study Protocol
A Protocol to Investigate Deep Brain Stimulation for Refractory Tinnitus: From Rat Model to the Set-Up of a Human Pilot Study
by Gusta van Zwieten, Jana V. P. Devos, Sonja A. Kotz, Linda Ackermans, Pia Brinkmann, Lobke Dauven, Erwin L. J. George, A. Miranda L. Janssen, Bernd Kremer, Carsten Leue, Michael Schwartze, Yasin Temel, Jasper V. Smit and Marcus L. F. Janssen
Audiol. Res. 2023, 13(1), 49-63; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres13010005 - 31 Dec 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2253
Abstract
Background: Chronic tinnitus can have an immense impact on quality of life. Despite recent treatment advances, many tinnitus patients remain refractory to them. Preclinical and clinical evidence suggests that deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a promising treatment to suppress tinnitus. In rats, it [...] Read more.
Background: Chronic tinnitus can have an immense impact on quality of life. Despite recent treatment advances, many tinnitus patients remain refractory to them. Preclinical and clinical evidence suggests that deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a promising treatment to suppress tinnitus. In rats, it has been shown in multiple regions of the auditory pathway that DBS can have an alleviating effect on tinnitus. The thalamic medial geniculate body (MGB) takes a key position in the tinnitus network, shows pathophysiological hallmarks of tinnitus, and is readily accessible using stereotaxy. Here, a protocol is described to evaluate the safety and test the therapeutic effects of DBS in the MGB in severe tinnitus sufferers. Methods: Bilateral DBS of the MGB will be applied in a future study in six patients with severe and refractory tinnitus. A double-blinded, randomized 2 × 2 crossover design (stimulation ON and OFF) will be applied, followed by a period of six months of open-label follow-up. The primary focus is to assess safety and feasibility (acceptability). Secondary outcomes assess a potential treatment effect and include tinnitus severity measured by the Tinnitus Functional Index (TFI), tinnitus loudness and distress, hearing, cognitive and psychological functions, quality of life, and neurophysiological characteristics. Discussion: This protocol carefully balances risks and benefits and takes ethical considerations into account. This study will explore the safety and feasibility of DBS in severe refractory tinnitus, through extensive assessment of clinical and neurophysiological outcome measures. Additionally, important insights into the underlying mechanism of tinnitus and hearing function might be revealed. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03976908 (6 June 2019). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Translational Research in Audiology)
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17 pages, 945 KiB  
Article
Design and Development of a Spanish Hearing Test for Speech in Noise (PAHRE)
by Marlene Rodríguez-Ferreiro, Montserrat Durán-Bouza and Victoria Marrero-Aguiar
Audiol. Res. 2023, 13(1), 32-48; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres13010004 - 30 Dec 2022
Viewed by 1710
Abstract
Background: There are few hearing tests in Spanish that assess speech discrimination in noise in the adult population that take into account the Lombard effect. This study presents the design and development of a Spanish hearing test for speech in noise (Prueba Auditiva [...] Read more.
Background: There are few hearing tests in Spanish that assess speech discrimination in noise in the adult population that take into account the Lombard effect. This study presents the design and development of a Spanish hearing test for speech in noise (Prueba Auditiva de Habla en Ruido en Español (PAHRE) in Spanish). The pattern of the Quick Speech in Noise test was followed when drafting sentences with five key words each grouped in lists of six sentences. It was necessary to take into account the differences between English and Spanish. Methods: A total of 61 people (24 men and 37 women) with an average age of 46.9 (range 18–84 years) participated in the study. The work was carried out in two phases. In the first phase, a list of Spanish sentences was drafted and subjected to a familiarity test based on the semantic and syntactic characteristics of the sentences; as a result, a list of sentences was selected for the final test. In the second phase, the selected sentences were recorded with and without the Lombard effect, the equivalence between both lists was analysed, and the test was applied to a first reference population. Results: The results obtained allow us to affirm that it is representative of the Spanish spoken in its variety in peninsular Spain. Conclusions: In addition, these results point to the usefulness of the PAHRE test in assessing speech in noise by maintaining a fixed speech intensity while varying the intensity of the multi-speaker background noise. The incorporation of the Lombard effect in the test shows discrimination differences with the same signal-to-noise ratio compared to the test without the Lombard effect. Full article
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9 pages, 6677 KiB  
Article
Comparison of Tinnitus Handicap Inventory and Tinnitus Functional Index as Treatment Outcomes
by Marta Fernández, María Cuesta, Ricardo Sanz and Pedro Cobo
Audiol. Res. 2023, 13(1), 23-31; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres13010003 - 26 Dec 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2230
Abstract
Background: Tinnitus is an audiological disorder for which there are no objective measuring tools. Thus, many self-report questionnaires have been proposed to assess its severity. These questionnaires have been judged for their capacity to assess the tinnitus severity at baseline, their sensitivity to [...] Read more.
Background: Tinnitus is an audiological disorder for which there are no objective measuring tools. Thus, many self-report questionnaires have been proposed to assess its severity. These questionnaires have been judged for their capacity to assess the tinnitus severity at baseline, their sensitivity to treatment-related changes (responsiveness), and their resolution. Methods: The most widely used questionnaires for clinical and research studies are the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) and the Tinnitus Functional Index (TFI). While both questionnaires have been recognized as good evaluators of the baseline tinnitus severity, the latter is considered to be more responsive to changes following treatments. Objectives: The aim of this work is to provide a preliminary comparison of the performance of both questionnaires in the initial and final tinnitus severity assessment of a cohort of patients undergoing a four-month Enriched Acoustic Environment (EAE) therapy. Results: The EAE therapy provided a 30 and 26 point reduction in THI and TFI, respectively. A good correlation is obtained between the THI and TFI questionnaires at baseline and after the treatment. Conclusion: At baseline, the THI provided a higher score than the TFI for a higher degree of tinnitus but a lower score for lower tinnitus severity. Both THI and TFI were good questionnaires for baseline assessment and for treatment-related changes. The THI provided a slightly higher score drop than the TFI following the treatment, although the TFI had better resolution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insights on Somatosensory Tinnitus and Research Needs)
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11 pages, 2169 KiB  
Article
Vestibular Migraine versus Méniere’s Disease: Diagnostic Utility of Electrocochleography
by Paul Tabet, Ahlem Elblidi and Issam Saliba
Audiol. Res. 2023, 13(1), 12-22; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres13010002 - 26 Dec 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2256
Abstract
Objectives: The diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine (VM) and Méniere’s disease (MD) present an important overlap, which leads to a difficult diagnosis in patients presenting with headache, vertigo, hearing loss, ear fullness, and tinnitus. The objective of our study is to determine whether [...] Read more.
Objectives: The diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine (VM) and Méniere’s disease (MD) present an important overlap, which leads to a difficult diagnosis in patients presenting with headache, vertigo, hearing loss, ear fullness, and tinnitus. The objective of our study is to determine whether the area-under-the-curve ratio of the summating potentials (SP) and action potentials (AP) curves on electrocochleography (ECoG) helps differentiate VM from MD with or without the use of the well-established clinical criteria. Method: A retrospective review of patients filling either VM or MD criteria was undertaken between September 2015 and December 2018. All patients underwent ECoG before the introduction of anti-migraine therapy. The prediction of symptom improvement between the clinical criteria and ECoG results was compared by using the Vertigo Symptom Scale. Results: In total, 119 patients were included. An overlap of 36% exists between patients filling VM and MD criteria. Clinical criteria alone did not demonstrate a significant prediction of symptom response to anti-migraine therapy (VM 83%, MD 51%; p = 0.10). However, ECoG results alone did demonstrate adequate prediction (VM 94%, MD 32%; p < 0.001). A negative ECoG result combined with the clinical criteria of VM (100% symptom improvement) was shown to be more predictive of treatment response when compared to clinical criteria alone (83% symptom improvement) (p = 0.017). Finally, when used in patients filling both the VM and MD criteria (VMMD), ECoG was able to predict symptom improvement, thus better differentiating both diseases (normal ECoG: 95%, abnormal ECoG 29%; p < 0.001). Conclusion: Combining VM criteria with normal ECoG using the AUC ratio seems superior in predicting adequate symptom improvement than VM criteria alone. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Vestibular System: Physiology and Testing Methods)
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11 pages, 835 KiB  
Article
Cochlear Implantation Following Transcanal Infrapromontorial Approach for Vestibular Schwannoma: A Case Series
by Virginia Dallari, Enrico Apa, Daniele Monzani, Elisabetta Genovese, Daniele Marchioni, Davide Soloperto and Luca Sacchetto
Audiol. Res. 2023, 13(1), 1-11; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres13010001 - 21 Dec 2022
Viewed by 1719
Abstract
Background: Cochlear implantation (CI) following endoscopic transcanal infrapromontorial vestibular schwannoma (VS) dissection is a feasible intervention in intracanalicular VS, with minimal extension into the cerebellopontine angle, but no audiologic results have ever been reported in the literature. Methods: From 2015 to 2021 [...] Read more.
Background: Cochlear implantation (CI) following endoscopic transcanal infrapromontorial vestibular schwannoma (VS) dissection is a feasible intervention in intracanalicular VS, with minimal extension into the cerebellopontine angle, but no audiologic results have ever been reported in the literature. Methods: From 2015 to 2021 in the Otorhynolaryngology Departments of Modena and Verona, three patients underwent this intervention. All were suffering from sporadic left-sided intracanalicular Koos I VS. Intraoperative electrically evoked auditory brainstem responses and electrophysiological measurements were performed before and after the placement of the electrode array, respectively. Since device activation one month after the surgery, each patient was followed up with audiometric tests, data logging, electrode impedance measurements and neural response telemetry performed at each scheduled fitting session at 15 days and 3, 6, 12 and 24 months. Results: Only in patient No. 3, an auditory benefit was observed and still evident even 36 months after activation. Impedances increased progressively in patient No. 1 and a benefit was never reported. Patient No. 2 left the follow-up for worsening comorbidities. Conclusions: CI following transcanal infrapromontorial VS resection is a beneficial intervention. The residual cochlear nerve after the tumour dissection and the course of electrophysiological measurements in the postoperative period were the main predictive factors for audiological outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hearing and Balance in Acoustic Neuroma)
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