Next Article in Journal
The Economic Case for Electric Vehicles in Public Sector Fleets: An Italian Case Study
Next Article in Special Issue
Iron Loss Modelling of Electrical Traction Motors for Improved Prediction of Higher Harmonic Losses
Previous Article in Journal / Special Issue
Moving a Taxi Sector to Become Electric: Characterizing Taxi Drivers Interested in Purchasing a Full Electric Vehicle
Open AccessArticle

Impact of Smart Charging for Consumers in a Real World Pilot

1
Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, Urban Technology, 1097 DZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands
2
ElaadNL, 6812 AR Arnhem, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
This paper is an extended version of our paper published in 32nd International Electric Vehicle Symposium 2019 (EVS 32), Lyon, France, 19–22 May 2019.
World Electr. Veh. J. 2020, 11(1), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/wevj11010021
Received: 6 December 2019 / Revised: 24 February 2020 / Accepted: 2 March 2020 / Published: 6 March 2020
A smart charging profile was implemented on 39 public charging stations in Amsterdam on which the current level available for electric vehicle (EV) charging was limited during peak hours on the electricity grid (07:00–08:30 and 17:00–20:00) and was increased during the rest of the day. The impact of this profile was measured on three indicators: average charging power, amount of transferred energy and share of positively and negatively affected sessions. The results are distinguished for different categories of electric vehicles with different charging characteristics (number of phases and maximum current). The results depend heavily on this categorisation and are a realistic measurement of the impact of smart charging under real world conditions. The average charging power increased as a result of the new profile and a reduction in the amount of transferred energy was detected during the evening hours, causing outstanding demand which was solved at an accelerated rate after limitations were lifted. For the whole population, 4% of the sessions were positively affected (charged a larger volume of energy) and 5% were negatively affected. These numbers are dominated by the large share of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) in Amsterdam which are technically not able to profit from the higher current levels. For new generation electric vehicles, 14% of the sessions were positively affected and the percentage of negatively affected sessions was 5%. View Full-Text
Keywords: smart charging; electric vehicles; energy transition; charging infrastructure smart charging; electric vehicles; energy transition; charging infrastructure
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Bons, P.C.; Buatois, A.; Ligthart, G.; Geerts, F.; Piersma, N.; van den Hoed, R. Impact of Smart Charging for Consumers in a Real World Pilot. World Electr. Veh. J. 2020, 11, 21. https://doi.org/10.3390/wevj11010021

AMA Style

Bons PC, Buatois A, Ligthart G, Geerts F, Piersma N, van den Hoed R. Impact of Smart Charging for Consumers in a Real World Pilot. World Electric Vehicle Journal. 2020; 11(1):21. https://doi.org/10.3390/wevj11010021

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bons, Pieter C.; Buatois, Aymeric; Ligthart, Guido; Geerts, Frank; Piersma, Nanda; van den Hoed, Robert. 2020. "Impact of Smart Charging for Consumers in a Real World Pilot" World Electr. Veh. J. 11, no. 1: 21. https://doi.org/10.3390/wevj11010021

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop