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Open AccessArticle

Development of a Biodegradable Subcutaneous Implant for Prolonged Drug Delivery Using 3D Printing

1
School of Pharmacy, Queen’s University Belfast, 97 Lisburn Road, Belfast BT9 7BL, UK
2
Nanotechnology and Integrated Bio-Engineering Centre (NIBEC), Ulster University, Jordanstown BT37 0QB, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Pharmaceutics 2020, 12(2), 105; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics12020105
Received: 30 December 2019 / Revised: 20 January 2020 / Accepted: 24 January 2020 / Published: 28 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 3D Printing of Pharmaceuticals and Drug Delivery Devices)
Implantable drug delivery devices offer many advantages over other routes of drug delivery. Most significantly, the delivery of lower doses of drug, thus, potentially reducing side-effects and improving patient compliance. Three dimensional (3D) printing is a flexible technique, which has been subject to increasing interest in the past few years, especially in the area of medical devices. The present work focussed on the use of 3D printing as a tool to manufacture implantable drug delivery devices to deliver a range of model compounds (methylene blue, ibuprofen sodium and ibuprofen acid) in two in vitro models. Five implant designs were produced, and the release rate varied, depending on the implant design and the drug properties. Additionally, a rate controlling membrane was produced, which further prolonged the release from the produced implants, signalling the potential use of these devices for chronic conditions. View Full-Text
Keywords: implantable devices; subcutaneous; biodegradable; 3D printing; prolonged drug delivery implantable devices; subcutaneous; biodegradable; 3D printing; prolonged drug delivery
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MDPI and ACS Style

Stewart, S.A.; Domínguez-Robles, J.; McIlorum, V.J.; Mancuso, E.; Lamprou, D.A.; Donnelly, R.F.; Larrañeta, E. Development of a Biodegradable Subcutaneous Implant for Prolonged Drug Delivery Using 3D Printing. Pharmaceutics 2020, 12, 105.

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