Next Article in Journal
Evaluation of EPISEQ SARS-CoV-2 and a Fully Integrated Application to Identify SARS-CoV-2 Variants from Several Next-Generation Sequencing Approaches
Next Article in Special Issue
Abundance of Poleroviruses within Tasmanian Pea Crops and Surrounding Weeds, and the Genetic Diversity of TuYV Isolates Found
Previous Article in Journal
Detection of HIV-1 Transmission Clusters from Dried Blood Spots within a Universal Test-and-Treat Trial in East Africa
Previous Article in Special Issue
Is the Glycoprotein Responsible for the Differences in Dispersal Rates between Lettuce Necrotic Yellows Virus Subgroups?
 
 
Brief Report

Spillover of a Tobamovirus from the Australian Indigenous Flora to Invasive Weeds

1
Plant Biotechnology Research Group (Virology), Western Australian State Agricultural Biotechnology Centre, Murdoch University, 90 South Street, Murdoch 6150, Australia
2
Institute of Industrial Crops, Jiangsu Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Nanjing 210014, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Henryk Czosnek
Viruses 2022, 14(8), 1676; https://doi.org/10.3390/v14081676
Received: 10 July 2022 / Revised: 25 July 2022 / Accepted: 28 July 2022 / Published: 29 July 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Plant Virus Research in Australasia)
The tobamovirus yellow tailflower mild mottle virus (YTMMV) was previously reported in wild plants of Anthocercis species (family Solanaceae) and other solanaceous indigenous species growing in natural habitats in Western Australia. Here, we undertook a survey of two introduced solanaceous weeds, namely Solanum nigrum (black nightshade) and Physalis peruviana (cape gooseberry) in the Perth metropolitan area and surrounds to determine if YTMMV has spread naturally to these species. At a remnant natural bushland site where both solanaceous weeds and indigenous Anthocercis hosts grew adjacent to one another, a proportion of S. nigrum and P. peruviana plants were asymptomatically-infected with YTMMV, confirming spillover had occurred. Populations of S. nigrum also grow as weeds in parts of the city isolated from remnant bushland and indigenous sources of YTMMV, and some of these populations were also infected with YTMMV. Fruit was harvested from virus-infected wild S. nigrum plants and the seed germinated under controlled conditions. Up to 80% of resultant seedlings derived from infected parent plants were infected with YTMMV, confirming that the virus is vertically-transmitted in S. nigrum, and therefore infection appears to be self-sustaining in this species. This is the first report of spillover of YTMMV to exotic weeds, and of vertical transmission of this tobamovirus. We discuss the roles of vertical and horizontal transmission in this spillover event, and its implications for biosecurity. View Full-Text
Keywords: virus spillover; emergence; wild-plant virus; tobamovirus; virus transmission virus spillover; emergence; wild-plant virus; tobamovirus; virus transmission
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Xu, W.; Li, H.; Sivasithamparam, K.; Tran, D.T.; Jones, M.G.K.; Chen, X.; Wylie, S.J. Spillover of a Tobamovirus from the Australian Indigenous Flora to Invasive Weeds. Viruses 2022, 14, 1676. https://doi.org/10.3390/v14081676

AMA Style

Xu W, Li H, Sivasithamparam K, Tran DT, Jones MGK, Chen X, Wylie SJ. Spillover of a Tobamovirus from the Australian Indigenous Flora to Invasive Weeds. Viruses. 2022; 14(8):1676. https://doi.org/10.3390/v14081676

Chicago/Turabian Style

Xu, Weinan, Hua Li, Krishnapillai Sivasithamparam, Dieu Thi Tran, Michael G. K. Jones, Xin Chen, and Stephen J. Wylie. 2022. "Spillover of a Tobamovirus from the Australian Indigenous Flora to Invasive Weeds" Viruses 14, no. 8: 1676. https://doi.org/10.3390/v14081676

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop