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Systematic Review

SARS-CoV-2 Vaccines during Pregnancy and Breastfeeding: A Systematic Review of Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes

Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Medical and Surgical Department of Fetus-Newborn-Infant, “Bambino Gesù” Children’s Hospital IRCCS, 00165 Rome, Italy
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Hin Chu
Viruses 2022, 14(3), 539; https://doi.org/10.3390/v14030539
Received: 13 January 2022 / Revised: 19 February 2022 / Accepted: 3 March 2022 / Published: 5 March 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue SARS-CoV-2 and Other Coronaviruses)
(1) Objective: This systematic review summarizes current knowledges about maternal and neonatal outcomes following COVID-19 vaccination during pregnancy and breastfeeding. (2) Study design: PubMed, Cochrane Library, and the Education Resources Information Center (ERIC) were searched up to 27 October 2021. The primary outcome was to estimate how many pregnant and lactating women were reported to be vaccinated and had available maternal and neonatal outcomes. (3) Results: Forty-five studies sourcing data of 74,908 pregnant women and 5098 lactating women who received COVID-19 vaccination were considered as eligible. No major side-effects were reported, especially during the second and third trimester of pregnancy and during breastfeeding. Conversely, available studies revealed that infants received specific SARS-CoV-2 antibodies after maternal vaccination. (4) Conclusions: Vaccination against the SARS-CoV-2 virus should be recommended for pregnant women, after the pros and cons have been adequately explained. In particular, given the still limited evidence and considering that fever during the first months of gestation increases the possibility of congenital anomalies, they should be carefully counseled. The same considerations apply to breastfeeding women, also considering the immune responses that mRNA vaccines can generate in their human milk. View Full-Text
Keywords: neonates; COVID-19; infants; mothers; pregnancy; fetuses; miscarriage; malformations; women neonates; COVID-19; infants; mothers; pregnancy; fetuses; miscarriage; malformations; women
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MDPI and ACS Style

De Rose, D.U.; Salvatori, G.; Dotta, A.; Auriti, C. SARS-CoV-2 Vaccines during Pregnancy and Breastfeeding: A Systematic Review of Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes. Viruses 2022, 14, 539. https://doi.org/10.3390/v14030539

AMA Style

De Rose DU, Salvatori G, Dotta A, Auriti C. SARS-CoV-2 Vaccines during Pregnancy and Breastfeeding: A Systematic Review of Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes. Viruses. 2022; 14(3):539. https://doi.org/10.3390/v14030539

Chicago/Turabian Style

De Rose, Domenico U., Guglielmo Salvatori, Andrea Dotta, and Cinzia Auriti. 2022. "SARS-CoV-2 Vaccines during Pregnancy and Breastfeeding: A Systematic Review of Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes" Viruses 14, no. 3: 539. https://doi.org/10.3390/v14030539

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