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Article

A Cork Cell Wall Approach to Swelling and Boiling with ESEM Technology

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Mediterranean Institute for Agriculture, Environment and Development (MED), School of Sciences and Technology, University of Évora, Pólo da Mitra, Ap. 94, 7006-554 Évora, Portugal
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Chair of Soil Resources and Land Use, Institute of Soil Science and Site Ecology, Technische Universität Dresden, Pienner Str. 8, 01737 Tharandt, Germany
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Department of Forest Management, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Science, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcká 129, 165 00 Prague-Suchdol, Czech Republic
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Department of Forest Sciences and Landscape Architecture, University of Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, Quinta de Prados, 5001-801 Vila Real, Portugal
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Department of Plant Science, Institute of Earth Science (ICT), School of Sciences and Technology, University of Évora, Pólo da Mitra, Ap. 94, 7006-554 Évora, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Angela Lo Monaco
Forests 2022, 13(4), 623; https://doi.org/10.3390/f13040623
Received: 30 March 2022 / Revised: 13 April 2022 / Accepted: 14 April 2022 / Published: 15 April 2022
(This article belongs to the Section Wood Science and Forest Products)
The bark of cork oak (Quercus suber L.) is mostly used for cork stopper production; when bark undergoes a series of industrial procedures, boiling usually leads to changes in the characteristics of its tissue. Trees are traditionally grown under natural conditions; however, irrigation is now being used in plantations. This permanent water availability affects cork oak development, while its effects on industrial procedures are unknown. This study provides the first insight into the behaviour of the cell walls of cork during the process of swelling and boiling when trees have been grown under irrigation, that is, subject to a specific water regime. Cork tissue is analysed using environmental and scanning electron microscopy under three regimes: raw conditions, following immersion in water, and after boiling. Additionally, the radial expansion of samples is determined. The results show greater cell wall expansion in cork from the irrigated site than in cork from the traditional rainfed plot when hydrated for 24 h. After boiling, the cell walls of the cork from the rainfed site are thinner than in the raw stage, which is in contrast to the irrigated cork. This study suggests that irrigation during cork oak growth produces a higher capacity for adsorption, increasing cell wall thickness from the raw stage to the boiling stage. View Full-Text
Keywords: Quercus suber L.; cell wall; environmental scanning electron microscope Quercus suber L.; cell wall; environmental scanning electron microscope
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MDPI and ACS Style

Poeiras, A.P.; Vogel, C.; Günther, B.; Camilo-Alves, C.; Surový, P.; Silva, M.E.; de Almeida Ribeiro, N. A Cork Cell Wall Approach to Swelling and Boiling with ESEM Technology. Forests 2022, 13, 623. https://doi.org/10.3390/f13040623

AMA Style

Poeiras AP, Vogel C, Günther B, Camilo-Alves C, Surový P, Silva ME, de Almeida Ribeiro N. A Cork Cell Wall Approach to Swelling and Boiling with ESEM Technology. Forests. 2022; 13(4):623. https://doi.org/10.3390/f13040623

Chicago/Turabian Style

Poeiras, Ana Patrícia, Cordula Vogel, Björn Günther, Constança Camilo-Alves, Peter Surový, Maria Emília Silva, and Nuno de Almeida Ribeiro. 2022. "A Cork Cell Wall Approach to Swelling and Boiling with ESEM Technology" Forests 13, no. 4: 623. https://doi.org/10.3390/f13040623

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