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Open AccessArticle

Sustainable Timber Trade: A Study on Discrepancies in Chinese Logs and Lumber Trade Statistics

1
School of Economics and Management, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing 100083, China
2
Center for International Trade in Forest Products (CINTRAFOR), School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2020, 11(2), 205; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11020205
Received: 20 January 2020 / Revised: 4 February 2020 / Accepted: 8 February 2020 / Published: 12 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Forest Economics, Policy, and Social Science)
Discrepancies in trade statistics can be normal or benign and attributed to a wide variety of unintentional factors, or in some instances within the timber products sector, such discrepancies can be associated with “systemic” factors that distort trade statistics, including (i) measurement and shipment issues, (ii) misreporting of product volumes, (iii) misclassification of timber product types, and (iv) government regulations concerned about trade. This study measured trade discrepancies in logs and lumber trade statistics for China and its trading partner countries from 2002 to 2018 using a time-lagged function, based on the customs data available from Global Trade Information Services (GTIS), with the aim of exploring a more nuanced understanding of trade discrepancies and their “systemic” factors. The results showed that the range of overall discrepancies in logs and lumber trade statistics shrunk over time, from [−0.069, 1.207] in 2002–2007 to [−0.120, 0.408] in 2013–2018. The larger trade flows of logs and lumber from Russia, New Zealand, and the U.S. (each above 10% of total China’s import) showed small trade statistics discrepancy ratios, which were less than ± 0.06. However, trade discrepancies still remained large at the disaggregated level, and significant differences of trade discrepancies between tropical and non-tropical countries. The range of trade discrepancies in hardwood logs increased from 2002 to 2018 and appeared to be attributed to misclassification and misreporting in tropical countries such as Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand, and Ghana. However, these countries’ trade flows are becoming relatively minor over time. Government policies are suggested to play an important role in influencing both the occurrence and resolution of trade discrepancies. View Full-Text
Keywords: trade discrepancies; logs and lumber import; misreporting; misclassification; policy impact trade discrepancies; logs and lumber import; misreporting; misclassification; policy impact
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MDPI and ACS Style

Liu, F.; Wheiler, K.; Ganguly, I.; Hu, M. Sustainable Timber Trade: A Study on Discrepancies in Chinese Logs and Lumber Trade Statistics. Forests 2020, 11, 205. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11020205

AMA Style

Liu F, Wheiler K, Ganguly I, Hu M. Sustainable Timber Trade: A Study on Discrepancies in Chinese Logs and Lumber Trade Statistics. Forests. 2020; 11(2):205. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11020205

Chicago/Turabian Style

Liu, Fei; Wheiler, Kent; Ganguly, Indroneil; Hu, Mingxing. 2020. "Sustainable Timber Trade: A Study on Discrepancies in Chinese Logs and Lumber Trade Statistics" Forests 11, no. 2: 205. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11020205

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