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Article

Public Preferences and Willingness to Pay for Invasive Forest Pest Prevention Programs in Urban Areas

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School of Forest Resources & Conservation, University of Florida, P.O. Box 110410, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
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School of Natural Resources & The Environment, The University of Arizona, ENR2-N216, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
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Food and Resource Economics Department, University of Florida, McCarty Hall B, Gainesville, FL 32603, USA
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USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station, 4955 Canyon Crest Dr., Riverside, CA 92507, USA
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Rosen College of Hospitality Management and National Center for Integrated Coastal Research, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32819, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2020, 11(10), 1056; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11101056
Received: 26 August 2020 / Revised: 26 September 2020 / Accepted: 27 September 2020 / Published: 30 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Forest Economics, Policy, and Social Science)
Invasive forest pests can cause environmental and economic damage amounting to billions of dollars (US) in lost revenues, restoration and response costs, and the loss of ecosystem services nationwide. Unfortunately, these forest pests do not stay confined to wildland forest areas and can spread into suburban and urban areas, imposing significant costs on local governments, homeowners, and management agencies. In this study, a contingent valuation experiment is used to estimate Florida residents’ willingness to pay (WTP) a monthly utility fee that would protect urban forests from invasive pests by implementing a monitoring and prevention program for their early detection and eradication. On average, the respondents are WTP US $5.44 per month to implement the surveillance program, revealing an aggregate WTP in the order of US $540 million per year. The results also reveal that respondents are sensitive to the scope of the program, with higher rates of participation and higher WTP for a program that is more effective at preventing forest pest invasions. View Full-Text
Keywords: urban forest; natural forest; invasive species; urban residents; non-market valuation urban forest; natural forest; invasive species; urban residents; non-market valuation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Adams, D.C.; Soto, J.R.; Lai, J.; Escobedo, F.J.; Alvarez, S.; Kibria, A.S.M.G. Public Preferences and Willingness to Pay for Invasive Forest Pest Prevention Programs in Urban Areas. Forests 2020, 11, 1056. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11101056

AMA Style

Adams DC, Soto JR, Lai J, Escobedo FJ, Alvarez S, Kibria ASMG. Public Preferences and Willingness to Pay for Invasive Forest Pest Prevention Programs in Urban Areas. Forests. 2020; 11(10):1056. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11101056

Chicago/Turabian Style

Adams, Damian C., José R. Soto, John Lai, Francisco J. Escobedo, Sergio Alvarez, and Abu S.M.G. Kibria 2020. "Public Preferences and Willingness to Pay for Invasive Forest Pest Prevention Programs in Urban Areas" Forests 11, no. 10: 1056. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11101056

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