Next Article in Journal
Effects of Landscape Fragmentation on Genetic Diversity of Male-Biased Dioecious Plant Pistacia chinensis Bunge Populations
Previous Article in Journal
Individual Rubber Tree Segmentation Based on Ground-Based LiDAR Data and Faster R-CNN of Deep Learning
Previous Article in Special Issue
Wetting Behavior of Alder (Alnus cordata (Loisel) Duby) Wood Surface: Effect of Thermo-Treatment and Alkyl Ketene Dimer (AKD)
Open AccessArticle

Wood Surface Changes of Heat-Treated Cunninghamia lanceolate Following Natural Weathering

1
Graduate School of Bioresource and Bioenvironmental Sciences, Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395, Japan
2
Laboratory of Wood Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2019, 10(9), 791; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10090791
Received: 21 August 2019 / Revised: 6 September 2019 / Accepted: 9 September 2019 / Published: 11 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wood Protection and Preservation)
To quickly clarify the effect of heat treatment on weatherability of Cunninghamia lanceolate (Lamb.) Hook., we investigated the surface degradation under natural exposure. A comparison between heat-treated and untreated samples was taken based on surface color changes and structural decay at each interval. Over four weeks of natural exposure, multiple measurements were carried out. Results show that color change decreased in the order of 220 °C heat-treated > untreated > 190 °C heat-treated. The results also indicate that the wood surface color stability was improved via the proper temperature of thermal modification. Low vacuum scanning electron microscopy (LVSEM) results expressed that thermal modification itself had caused shrinking in the wood surface structure. From the beginning of the weathering process, the heat treatment affected the surface structural stability. After natural exposure, the degree of wood structure decay followed the pattern 220 °C heat-treated > 190 °C heat-treated > untreated. Therefore, when considering the impact on the structure, thermal modification treatment as a protective measure to prevent weathering was not an ideal approach and requires further improvement. View Full-Text
Keywords: natural weathering; heat-treated; color change; wood anatomical; Cunninghamia lanceolate natural weathering; heat-treated; color change; wood anatomical; Cunninghamia lanceolate
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Cui, X.; Matsumura, J. Wood Surface Changes of Heat-Treated Cunninghamia lanceolate Following Natural Weathering. Forests 2019, 10, 791.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map

1
Back to TopTop