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Article

Obtaining Cross-Sections of Paint Layers in Cultural Artifacts Using Femtosecond Pulsed Lasers

1
Femtosecond Spectroscopy Unit, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, 1919-1 Tancha, Onna-son, Kunigami, Okinawa 904-0495, Japan
2
Art Conservation Program, Science and Technology Group, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, 1919-1 Tancha, Onna-son, Kunigami, Okinawa 904-0495, Japan
3
Art Conservation Program, Buffalo State College, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14222, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Academic Editor: Martin Byung-Guk Jun
Materials 2017, 10(2), 107; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma10020107
Received: 27 December 2016 / Revised: 17 January 2017 / Accepted: 18 January 2017 / Published: 26 January 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ultrafast Laser-Based Manufacturing)
Recently, ultrafast lasers exhibiting high peak powers and extremely short pulse durations have created a new paradigm in materials processing. The precision and minimal thermal damage provided by ultrafast lasers in the machining of metals and dielectrics also suggests a novel application in obtaining precise cross-sections of fragile, combustible paint layers in artwork and cultural heritage property. Cross-sections of paint and other decorative layers on artwork provide critical information into its history and authenticity. However, the current methodology which uses a scalpel to obtain a cross-section can cause further damage, including crumbling, delamination, and paint compression. Here, we demonstrate the ability to make controlled cross-sections of paint layers with a femtosecond pulsed laser, with minimal damage to the surrounding artwork. The femtosecond laser cutting overcomes challenges such as fragile paint disintegrating under scalpel pressure, or oxidation by the continuous-wave (CW) laser. Variations in laser power and translational speed of the laser while cutting exhibit different benefits for cross-section sampling. The use of femtosecond lasers in studying artwork also presents new possibilities in analyzing, sampling, and cleaning of artwork with minimal destructive effects. View Full-Text
Keywords: ultrafast laser; art conservation; material processing; CW laser; cross-section analysis ultrafast laser; art conservation; material processing; CW laser; cross-section analysis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Harada, T.; Spence, S.; Margiolakis, A.; Deckoff-Jones, S.; Ploeger, R.; Shugar, A.N.; Hamm, J.F.; Dani, K.M.; Dani, A.R. Obtaining Cross-Sections of Paint Layers in Cultural Artifacts Using Femtosecond Pulsed Lasers. Materials 2017, 10, 107. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma10020107

AMA Style

Harada T, Spence S, Margiolakis A, Deckoff-Jones S, Ploeger R, Shugar AN, Hamm JF, Dani KM, Dani AR. Obtaining Cross-Sections of Paint Layers in Cultural Artifacts Using Femtosecond Pulsed Lasers. Materials. 2017; 10(2):107. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma10020107

Chicago/Turabian Style

Harada, Takaaki, Stephanie Spence, Athanasios Margiolakis, Skylar Deckoff-Jones, Rebecca Ploeger, Aaron N. Shugar, James F. Hamm, Keshav M. Dani, and Anya R. Dani. 2017. "Obtaining Cross-Sections of Paint Layers in Cultural Artifacts Using Femtosecond Pulsed Lasers" Materials 10, no. 2: 107. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma10020107

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