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Article

The Effect of Lignin Content in Birch and Beech Kraft Cellulosic Pulps on Simple Sugar Yields from the Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose

1
Natural Fibers Advanced Technologies, 42A Blekitna Str., 93-322 Lodz, Poland
2
Institute of Technical Biochemistry, Lodz University of Technology, 4/10 Stefanowskiego Str., 90-924 Lodz, Poland
3
Faculty of Wood Technology, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, 159 Nowoursynowska Str., 02-776 Warsaw, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Energies 2019, 12(15), 2952; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12152952
Received: 10 June 2019 / Revised: 29 July 2019 / Accepted: 30 July 2019 / Published: 31 July 2019
(This article belongs to the Collection Bioenergy and Biofuel)
The results of enzymatic hydrolysis of birch and beech kraft cellulosic pulps indicate that they may be promising feedstocks for fermentation processes including biofuel manufacturing. The aim of this study was to investigate whether birch and beech wood require the same degree of delignification by kraft pulping as pine wood. The differences observed in the efficiency of hydrolysis for the raw materials tested suggest that the differences in the anatomical structure of the examined wood in relation to pine wood is essential for the efficiency of the enzymatic hydrolysis process. The yields of glucose and other reducing sugars obtained from the birch and beech cellulosic pulps were similar (up to around 75% and 98.3% dry weight, and 76% and 98.6% dry weight, respectively). The highest glucose yields from cellulose contained in the birch and beech pulp were around 81.2% (at a Kappa number of 28.3) and 83.1% (at a Kappa number of 30.4), respectively. The maximum glucose yields and total reducing sugars of birch wood on a dry weight basis (39.8% and 52.1%, respectively) were derived from the pulp at a Kappa number of 28.3, while the highest yields of glucose and total reducing sugars of beech wood on a dry weight basis (around 36.9% and 48.2%, respectively) were reached from the pulp at a Kappa number of 25.3. To obtain the highest glucose yields and total reducing sugars of a wood on a dry weight basis, total lignin elimination from the birch and beech pulps was not necessary. However more in-depth delignification of birch and beech wood is required than for pine wood. View Full-Text
Keywords: cellulosic pulps; birch; beech; wood; kraft pulping; enzymatic hydrolysis cellulosic pulps; birch; beech; wood; kraft pulping; enzymatic hydrolysis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Przybysz Buzała, K.; Kalinowska, H.; Małachowska, E.; Boruszewski, P.; Krajewski, K.; Przybysz, P. The Effect of Lignin Content in Birch and Beech Kraft Cellulosic Pulps on Simple Sugar Yields from the Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose. Energies 2019, 12, 2952. https://doi.org/10.3390/en12152952

AMA Style

Przybysz Buzała K, Kalinowska H, Małachowska E, Boruszewski P, Krajewski K, Przybysz P. The Effect of Lignin Content in Birch and Beech Kraft Cellulosic Pulps on Simple Sugar Yields from the Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose. Energies. 2019; 12(15):2952. https://doi.org/10.3390/en12152952

Chicago/Turabian Style

Przybysz Buzała, Kamila, Halina Kalinowska, Edyta Małachowska, Piotr Boruszewski, Krzysztof Krajewski, and Piotr Przybysz. 2019. "The Effect of Lignin Content in Birch and Beech Kraft Cellulosic Pulps on Simple Sugar Yields from the Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose" Energies 12, no. 15: 2952. https://doi.org/10.3390/en12152952

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