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Article

An Optimisation Study on Integrating and Incentivising Thermal Energy Storage (TES) in a Dwelling Energy System

1
Centre for Process Systems Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, UK
2
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XQ, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Energies 2018, 11(5), 1095; https://doi.org/10.3390/en11051095
Received: 1 April 2018 / Revised: 20 April 2018 / Accepted: 25 April 2018 / Published: 29 April 2018
In spite of the benefits from thermal energy storage (TES) integration in dwellings, the penetration rate in Europe is 5%. Effective fiscal policies are necessary to accelerate deployment. However, there is currently no direct support for TES in buildings compared to support for electricity storage. This could be due to lack of evidence to support incentivisation. In this study, a novel systematic framework is developed to provide a case in support of TES incentivisation. The model determines the costs, CO2 emissions, dispatch strategy and sizes of technologies, and TES for a domestic user under policy neutral and policy intensive scenarios. The model is applied to different building types in the UK. The model is applied to a case study for a detached dwelling in the UK (floor area of 122 m2), where heat demand is satisfied by a boiler and electricity imported from the grid. Results show that under a policy neutral scenario, integrating a micro-Combined Heat and Power (CHP) reduces the primary energy demand by 11%, CO2 emissions by 21%, but with a 16 year payback. Additional benefits from TES integration can pay for the investment within the first 9 years, reducing to 3.5–6 years when the CO2 levy is accounted for. Under a policy intensive scenario (for example considering the Feed in Tariff (FIT)), primary energy demand and CO2 emissions reduce by 17 and 33% respectively with a 5 year payback. In this case, the additional benefits for TES integration can pay for the investment in TES within the first 2 years. The framework developed is a useful tool is determining the role TES in decarbonising domestic energy systems. View Full-Text
Keywords: TES; multi-period mixed integer linear program; incentives; techno-economic analysis TES; multi-period mixed integer linear program; incentives; techno-economic analysis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Oluleye, G.; Allison, J.; Kelly, N.; Hawkes, A.D. An Optimisation Study on Integrating and Incentivising Thermal Energy Storage (TES) in a Dwelling Energy System. Energies 2018, 11, 1095. https://doi.org/10.3390/en11051095

AMA Style

Oluleye G, Allison J, Kelly N, Hawkes AD. An Optimisation Study on Integrating and Incentivising Thermal Energy Storage (TES) in a Dwelling Energy System. Energies. 2018; 11(5):1095. https://doi.org/10.3390/en11051095

Chicago/Turabian Style

Oluleye, Gbemi, John Allison, Nicolas Kelly, and Adam D. Hawkes. 2018. "An Optimisation Study on Integrating and Incentivising Thermal Energy Storage (TES) in a Dwelling Energy System" Energies 11, no. 5: 1095. https://doi.org/10.3390/en11051095

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