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Current Oncology is published by MDPI from Volume 28 Issue 1 (2021). Previous articles were published by another publisher in Open Access under a CC-BY (or CC-BY-NC-ND) licence, and they are hosted by MDPI on mdpi.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with Multimed Inc..

Curr. Oncol., Volume 13, Issue 6 (December 2006) – 6 articles

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Article
How Should We Describe the Benefits of Palliative Radiotherapy?
Curr. Oncol. 2006, 13(6), 230-234; https://doi.org/10.3747/co.v13i6.108 - 01 Dec 2006
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 168
Abstract
The value of radiotherapy for palliation is well known to oncologists but not necessarily to other physicians. Using terms such as symptom improvement ratio (SIR) and number needed to treat (NNT) rather than traditional response rates might be more [...] Read more.
The value of radiotherapy for palliation is well known to oncologists but not necessarily to other physicians. Using terms such as symptom improvement ratio (SIR) and number needed to treat (NNT) rather than traditional response rates might be more appropriate in describing the benefits of palliative radiotherapy to other health care professionals. Full article
Article
The Use of Prophylactic Anticonvulsants in Patients with Brain Tumours—A Systematic Review
Curr. Oncol. 2006, 13(6), 222-229; https://doi.org/10.3747/co.v13i6.107 - 01 Dec 2006
Cited by 21 | Viewed by 248
Abstract
Questions: Should patients with newly diagnosed brain tumours receive prophylactic anticonvulsants to reduce seizure risk? What is the best practice for patients with brain tumours who are taking anticonvulsant medications but who have never had a seizure? Perspectives: Patients with primary [...] Read more.
Questions: Should patients with newly diagnosed brain tumours receive prophylactic anticonvulsants to reduce seizure risk? What is the best practice for patients with brain tumours who are taking anticonvulsant medications but who have never had a seizure? Perspectives: Patients with primary or metastatic brain tumours who have never had a seizure still have a 20% risk of experiencing a seizure over the course of their disease. Because considerable practice variation exists in regard to the management of patients with brain tumours who have never had a seizure, and because conflicting evidence has been reported, the Neuro-oncology Disease Site Group (DSG) of Cancer Care Ontario’s Program in Evidence-based Care felt that a systematic review of the evidence was warranted. Outcomes: Outcomes of interest were incidence of seizures and adverse effects of prophylactic anticonvulsant therapy. Methodology: The MEDLINE and Cochrane Library databases were systematically searched for relevant evidence. The review included fully published reports or abstracts of randomized controlled trials (RCTs), systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and practice guidelines. The present systematic review was reviewed and approved by the Neuro-oncology DSG, which comprises medical and radiation oncologists, surgeons, neurologists, a nurse, and a patient representative. Results: Quality of Evidence: The literature search located one evidence-based practice guideline, one systematic review, and five RCTs that addressed prophylactic anticonvulsants for patients with brain tumours. Evidence for the best management of seizure-naïve patients who are already taking anticonvulsants was limited to one retrospective study and exploratory analyses within several RCTs. Benefits and Harms: Pooled results of the five RCTs suggest that the incidence of seizures in patients who receive prophylactic anticonvulsants is not significantly different from that in patients who do not receive anticonvulsants (relative risk: 1.04; 95% confidence interval: 0.70 to 1.54; p = 0.84). This analysis accords with results from a published meta-analysis. Evidence is insufficient to determine whether patients who are currently taking anticonvulsants but who have never had a seizure should taper the anticonvulsants. Patients who received anticonvulsants reported adverse effects, including rash, nausea, and hypotension, but whether these effects are a result of the anticonvulsants or of other treatments could not be determined. Conclusions: Based on the available evidence, the routine use of postoperative anticonvulsants is not recommended in seizure-naïve patients with newly diagnosed primary or secondary brain tumours, especially in light of a significant risk of serious adverse effects and problematic drug interactions. Because data are insufficient to recommend whether anticonvulsants should be tapered in patients who are already taking anticonvulsants but who have never had a seizure, treatment must be individualized. Full article
Article
Recommendations of the Canadian Consensus Group on the Management of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia
Curr. Oncol. 2006, 13(6), 201-221; https://doi.org/10.3747/co.v13i6.124 - 01 Dec 2006
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 196
Abstract
Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a disease characterized by the expression of Bcr/Abl, an oncogenic protein tyrosine kinase, and by evolution over time from a relatively benign chronic phase to a rapidly fatal CML blast crisis. Until recently, the standard of [...] Read more.
Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a disease characterized by the expression of Bcr/Abl, an oncogenic protein tyrosine kinase, and by evolution over time from a relatively benign chronic phase to a rapidly fatal CML blast crisis. Until recently, the standard of care included potentially curative therapy with allogeneic stem cell transplantation, available only to a minority (about 10%) of patients, or medical therapy with interferon-α with or without cytarabine, which helped to prolong the chronic phase of the disease in a minority of patients. The availability of imatinib mesylate, a selective inhibitor of Bcr/Abl approved by Health Canada in 2001, has profoundly altered the clinical and laboratory management of CML. This change in practice has been reviewed by the Canadian Consensus Group on the Management of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia and has resulted in a new set of recommendations for the optimal care of CML patients. Full article
Article
Retinoids, Vitamin D, Invasion, and Metastasis
Curr. Oncol. 2006, 13(6), 198-200; https://doi.org/10.3747/co.v13i6.120 - 01 Dec 2006
Viewed by 168
Abstract
Prostate cancer has a long latency period: 20 to 30 years or more [...] Full article
Article
The Cancer Patient’s Wife
Curr. Oncol. 2006, 13(6), 197; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol13060021 - 01 Dec 2006
Viewed by 163
Abstract
A friend of mine, Mary, received this call yesterday. [...] Full article
Editorial
Celebrating a Year of Change and Progress
Curr. Oncol. 2006, 13(6), 196; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol13060020 - 01 Dec 2006
Viewed by 149
Abstract
As 2006 draws to a close, Current Oncology is marking its most successful year to date, with a record number of manuscripts submitted and a record number published. [...] Full article
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