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Article

Pharmacological Adherence Behavior Changes during COVID-19 Outbreak in a Portugal Patient Cohort

by 1,2,3,4, 1,2,3, 3, 5,6 and 1,3,*
1
Associate Laboratory i4HB-Institute for Health and Bioeconomy, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, 4050-313 Porto, Portugal
2
UCIBIO–Applied Molecular Biosciences Unit, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, 4050-313 Porto, Portugal
3
Porto4Ageing-Competence Centre on Active and Healthy Ageing, University of Porto, 4050-313 Porto, Portugal
4
Institute of Biomedical Sciences Abel Salazar, University of Porto, 4050-313 Porto, Portugal
5
CINTESIS-Center for Research in Health Technologies and Services, 4200-450 Porto, Portugal
6
Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, 4200-450 Porto, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Dean G. Smith
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(3), 1135; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031135
Received: 3 December 2021 / Revised: 17 January 2022 / Accepted: 18 January 2022 / Published: 20 January 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Population Behavior during COVID-19)
Concerns, behaviours, and beliefs influence how people deal with COVID-19. Understanding the factors influencing adherence behaviour is of utmost importance to develop tailored interventions to increase adherence within this context. Hence, we aimed to understand how COVID-19 affected adherence behaviour in Portugal. A cross-sectional online survey was conducted between 1 March and 3 April 2021. Descriptive statistics were performed, as well as univariable and multivariable regression models. Of the 1202 participants, 476 who were taking at least one medication prescribed by the doctor were selected. Of these, 78.2% were female, and the mean age was 40.3 ± 17.9 years old. About 74.2% were classified as being highly adherent. During the pandemic, 8.2% of participants reported that their adherence improved, while 5.9% had worsened adherence results. Compared with being single, widowers were 3 times more prone to be less adherent (OR:3.390 [1.106–10.390], p = 0.033). Comorbid patients were 1.8 times (OR:1.824 [1.155–2.881], p = 0.010) more prone to be less adherent. Participants who reported that COVID-19 negatively impacted their adherence were 5.6 times more prone to be less adherent, compared with those who reported no changes (OR:5.576 [2.420–12.847], p < 0.001). None of the other variables showed to be significantly associated with pharmacological adherence. View Full-Text
Keywords: adherence; COVID-19; impact; behavior; Portugal adherence; COVID-19; impact; behavior; Portugal
MDPI and ACS Style

Midão, L.; Almada, M.; Carrilho, J.; Sampaio, R.; Costa, E. Pharmacological Adherence Behavior Changes during COVID-19 Outbreak in a Portugal Patient Cohort. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 1135. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031135

AMA Style

Midão L, Almada M, Carrilho J, Sampaio R, Costa E. Pharmacological Adherence Behavior Changes during COVID-19 Outbreak in a Portugal Patient Cohort. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2022; 19(3):1135. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031135

Chicago/Turabian Style

Midão, Luís, Marta Almada, Joana Carrilho, Rute Sampaio, and Elísio Costa. 2022. "Pharmacological Adherence Behavior Changes during COVID-19 Outbreak in a Portugal Patient Cohort" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19, no. 3: 1135. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031135

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