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Article

Kinematics of Cervical Spine during Rowing Ergometer at Different Stroke Rates in Young Rowers: A Pilot Study

1
Sport and Exercise Sciences Research Unit, Department of Psychology, Educational Science and Human Movement, University of Palermo, 90144 Palermo, Italy
2
Department of Coaching Science, Lithuanian Sports University, LT-44221 Kaunas, Lithuania
3
Regional Sports School of CONI Sicilia, 90141 Palermo, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Academic Editors: Paul B. Tchounwou and Byoung-Hee Lee
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(13), 7690; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19137690
Received: 30 April 2022 / Revised: 21 June 2022 / Accepted: 22 June 2022 / Published: 23 June 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medicine in Sports and Exercise)
Background: Research on biomechanics in rowing has mostly focused on the lumbar spine. However, injuries can also affect other body segments. Thus, the aim of this pilot study was to explore any potential variations in the kinematics of the cervical spine during two different stroke rates on the rowing ergometer in young rowers. Methods: Twelve young rowers of regional or national level were recruited for the study. The experimental protocol consisted of two separate test sessions (i.e., a sequence of 10 consecutive strokes for each test session) at different stroke rates (i.e., 20 and 30 strokes/min) on an indoor rowing ergometer. Kinematics of the cervical spine was assessed using an inertial sensor capable of measuring joint ROM (angle of flexion, angle of extension, total angle of flexion–extension). Results: Although there were no differences in the flexion and total flexion–extension movements between the test sessions, a significant increase in the extension movement was found at the highest stroke rate (p = 0.04, d = 0.66). Conclusion: Young rowers showed changes in cervical ROM according to stroke rate. The lower control of the head during the rowing stroke cycle can lead to a higher compensation resulting in an augmented effort, influencing sports performance, and increasing the risk of injury. View Full-Text
Keywords: joint mobility; range of motion; biomechanics; kinematics; sport performance; cervical mobility; cervical range of motion; rowing; stroke cycle; stroke rate joint mobility; range of motion; biomechanics; kinematics; sport performance; cervical mobility; cervical range of motion; rowing; stroke cycle; stroke rate
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MDPI and ACS Style

Giustino, V.; Zangla, D.; Messina, G.; Pajaujiene, S.; Feka, K.; Battaglia, G.; Bianco, A.; Palma, A.; Patti, A. Kinematics of Cervical Spine during Rowing Ergometer at Different Stroke Rates in Young Rowers: A Pilot Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 7690. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19137690

AMA Style

Giustino V, Zangla D, Messina G, Pajaujiene S, Feka K, Battaglia G, Bianco A, Palma A, Patti A. Kinematics of Cervical Spine during Rowing Ergometer at Different Stroke Rates in Young Rowers: A Pilot Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2022; 19(13):7690. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19137690

Chicago/Turabian Style

Giustino, Valerio, Daniele Zangla, Giuseppe Messina, Simona Pajaujiene, Kaltrina Feka, Giuseppe Battaglia, Antonino Bianco, Antonio Palma, and Antonino Patti. 2022. "Kinematics of Cervical Spine during Rowing Ergometer at Different Stroke Rates in Young Rowers: A Pilot Study" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19, no. 13: 7690. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19137690

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