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Article

Comparative Analysis of Teaching at Public Universities in Sinaloa during Confinement Due to COVID-19

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Faculty of Informatics Mazatlan, Autonomous University of Sinaloa, Mazatlan 82117, Mexico
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Nursing School, Mazatlan, Autonomous University of Sinaloa, Mazatlan 82117, Mexico
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General Hospital Dr. Martiniano Carvajal, Mazatlan 82127, Mexico
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Paul B. Tchounwou and Fernando Manuel Lourenço Martins
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(13), 7687; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19137687
Received: 10 May 2022 / Revised: 18 June 2022 / Accepted: 21 June 2022 / Published: 23 June 2022
The COVID-19 pandemic has affected educational institutions around the world. One partial solution for students and teachers to continue the academic process involved the use of software and hardware technologies via the internet. The main objective of this research was to analyze the actions carried out by computer science teachers (and teachers who taught related degrees) in Sinaloa, Mexico, during the COVID-19 confinement period, to determine if the working conditions were different at all educational institutions. Based on quantitative, descriptive–explanatory, correlational, field, and cross-sectional approaches to data collection—a survey was designed and sent to teachers who taught classes in computer science and related careers. The results showed that although teachers felt prepared in designing and implementing virtual courses (90.73%), 68.5% believed that virtual classes were not enough for students (i.e., regarding replacing the training being offered). Likewise, teachers observed that only 27.8% of their students showed real commitment to online classes. In the hypothesis test, a chi-squared value of 3.84 was obtained, with a significance (p-value) of 0.137. There was a probability of error of 13.7%; this is high, considering that the level of significance must be 0.05 (5%) or less. It was concluded that teachers must be permanently trained in the use of new digital technologies; in addition, they must continuously produce academic material and make it available to the educational community. It is necessary for universities to design plans for the regulated use of applications and devices for academic purposes, update study plans and programs, and train teachers and students beyond conventional education. View Full-Text
Keywords: e-learning; COVID-19; computer science teaching; distance education e-learning; COVID-19; computer science teaching; distance education
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MDPI and ACS Style

Tripp-Barba, C.; Zaldívar-Colado, A.; Peña-García, G.-M.; Aguilar-Calderón, J.-A.; Medina-Gutiérrez, A.-R. Comparative Analysis of Teaching at Public Universities in Sinaloa during Confinement Due to COVID-19. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 7687. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19137687

AMA Style

Tripp-Barba C, Zaldívar-Colado A, Peña-García G-M, Aguilar-Calderón J-A, Medina-Gutiérrez A-R. Comparative Analysis of Teaching at Public Universities in Sinaloa during Confinement Due to COVID-19. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2022; 19(13):7687. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19137687

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tripp-Barba, Carolina, Aníbal Zaldívar-Colado, Gloria-María Peña-García, José-Alfonso Aguilar-Calderón, and Ana-Rosa Medina-Gutiérrez. 2022. "Comparative Analysis of Teaching at Public Universities in Sinaloa during Confinement Due to COVID-19" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19, no. 13: 7687. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19137687

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