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Review

A Systematic Scoping Review of Media Campaigns to Develop a Typology to Evaluate Their Collective Impact on Promoting Healthy Hydration Behaviors and Reducing Sugary Beverage Health Risks

Department of Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(3), 1040; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031040
Received: 23 December 2020 / Revised: 18 January 2021 / Accepted: 21 January 2021 / Published: 25 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Collection Health Behaviors, Risk Factors, NCDs and Health Promotion)
Interventions to discourage sugary beverages and encourage water consumption have produced modest and unsustainable behavioral changes to reduce obesity and noncommunicable disease risks. This systematic scoping review examined media campaigns to develop a typology to support healthy hydration nonalcoholic beverage behaviors. Our three-step methodology included the following: (1) review and summarize expert-recommended healthy beverage guidelines; (2) review six English-language electronic databases guided by PRISMA to describe existing campaign types by issue, goal and underlying theory; and (3) develop a media campaign typology to support policies, systems and environments to encourage healthy hydration behaviors. Results showed no international consensus for healthy beverage guidelines, though we describe expert-recommended healthy beverage guidelines for the United States. Of 909 records identified, we included 24 articles describing distinct media campaigns and nine sources that defined models, schemes or taxonomies. The final media campaign typology included: (1) corporate advertising, marketing or entertainment; (2) corporate social responsibility, public relations/cause marketing; (3) social marketing; (4) public information, awareness, education/ health promotion; (5) media advocacy/countermarketing; and (6) political or public policy. This proof-of-concept media campaign typology can be used to evaluate their collective impact and support for a social change movement to reduce sugary beverage health risks and to encourage healthy hydration behaviors. View Full-Text
Keywords: typology; media campaign; social change; sugary beverages; water; healthy hydration typology; media campaign; social change; sugary beverages; water; healthy hydration
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kraak, V.I.; Consavage Stanley, K. A Systematic Scoping Review of Media Campaigns to Develop a Typology to Evaluate Their Collective Impact on Promoting Healthy Hydration Behaviors and Reducing Sugary Beverage Health Risks. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 1040. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031040

AMA Style

Kraak VI, Consavage Stanley K. A Systematic Scoping Review of Media Campaigns to Develop a Typology to Evaluate Their Collective Impact on Promoting Healthy Hydration Behaviors and Reducing Sugary Beverage Health Risks. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(3):1040. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031040

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kraak, Vivica I., and Katherine Consavage Stanley. 2021. "A Systematic Scoping Review of Media Campaigns to Develop a Typology to Evaluate Their Collective Impact on Promoting Healthy Hydration Behaviors and Reducing Sugary Beverage Health Risks" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 3: 1040. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031040

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