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Article

Association between Soft-Drink Intake and Obesity, Depression, and Subjective Health Status of Male and Female Adults

by 1 and 2,*
1
Food and Nutrition Major, Division of Food Science & Culinary Arts, Shinhan University, Uijeongbu-si 11644, Gyeonggi-do, Korea
2
Food and Nutrition Major, School of Wellness Industry Convergence, Hankyong National University, Anseong-si 17579, Gyeonggi-do, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(19), 10415; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph181910415
Received: 4 August 2021 / Revised: 28 September 2021 / Accepted: 29 September 2021 / Published: 3 October 2021
This study explores the association between soft-drink intake and obesity, depression, and subjective health status in male and female adults. Soft-drink consumption has become a serious public health issue worldwide. Participants of this study were selected (n = 3086) from the respondents in the Seventh Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2016 and divided into the non-soft-drink group (men, 502; women, 1117) and the soft-drink group (men, 684; women, 783). Soft-drink intake data were obtained, using a validated quantitative food frequency questionnaire and the 24 h dietary recall. Total energy intake and fat density were significantly higher, but the nutrient densities of carbohydrate, total dietary fiber, and micronutrients were significantly lower in the soft-drink group than in the non-soft-drink group. In men, soft-drink intake was found to be significantly associated with a lower risk of depression. Conversely, in women, soft-drink intake was found to be significantly associated with the higher risks of depression, obesity, and poor subjective health status. Therefore, less frequent soft-drink intake may prevent obesity and depression in Korean women. View Full-Text
Keywords: soft drinks; obesity; depression; subjective health status; male and female adults soft drinks; obesity; depression; subjective health status; male and female adults
MDPI and ACS Style

Kim, J.-M.; Lee, E. Association between Soft-Drink Intake and Obesity, Depression, and Subjective Health Status of Male and Female Adults. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 10415. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph181910415

AMA Style

Kim J-M, Lee E. Association between Soft-Drink Intake and Obesity, Depression, and Subjective Health Status of Male and Female Adults. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(19):10415. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph181910415

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kim, Ji-Myung, and EunJung Lee. 2021. "Association between Soft-Drink Intake and Obesity, Depression, and Subjective Health Status of Male and Female Adults" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 19: 10415. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph181910415

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