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Article

Relationship between Posture and Non-Contact Lower Limb Injury in Young Male Amateur Football Players: A Prospective Cohort Study

1
School of Health Sciences, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
2
Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
3
School of Education, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
4
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Panagiota (Nota) Klentrou and Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(12), 6424; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18126424
Received: 29 April 2021 / Revised: 1 June 2021 / Accepted: 7 June 2021 / Published: 14 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health, Physical Activity and Performance in Youth)
Posture, a potentially modifiable injury risk factor, is considered important in injury screening/prevention in athletes, yet few studies investigate relationships between posture and injury. This prospective cohort study investigated whether static posture is associated with lower limb injury risk in male football players (n = 263). Nine aspects of static standing posture (left and right rearfoot, knee interspace, lateral knee, lumbar lordosis, thoracic kyphosis, scoliosis S and C, forward head) were assessed from photographs during the pre-season using the modified Watson and Mac Donncha scale, which was dichotomised for analysis (deviated or normal). Player characteristics (age, height, mass, body mass index, competition level), match/training exposure, and previous and in-season non-contact lower limb injuries were recorded. Binary logistic regression investigated relationships between posture and injury (previous and in-season). Eighty previous and 24 in-season lower limb injuries were recorded. Previous injury was not associated with any postural variable. In-season injury was associated with previous injury (OR = 3.04, 95% CI 1.20–7.68, p = 0.02) and having a normal thoracic curve compared to kyphosis (OR = 0.38, 95% CI 0.15–1.00, p = 0.05) but no other postural variables. Static postural deviations observed in male football players in the pre-season are not typically associated with non-contact lower limb injury risk; thus, they are unlikely to add value to pre-season screening programs. View Full-Text
Keywords: postures; soccer; sports injury postures; soccer; sports injury
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MDPI and ACS Style

Snodgrass, S.J.; Ryan, K.E.; Miller, A.; James, D.; Callister, R. Relationship between Posture and Non-Contact Lower Limb Injury in Young Male Amateur Football Players: A Prospective Cohort Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 6424. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18126424

AMA Style

Snodgrass SJ, Ryan KE, Miller A, James D, Callister R. Relationship between Posture and Non-Contact Lower Limb Injury in Young Male Amateur Football Players: A Prospective Cohort Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(12):6424. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18126424

Chicago/Turabian Style

Snodgrass, Suzanne J., Kathleen E. Ryan, Andrew Miller, Daphne James, and Robin Callister. 2021. "Relationship between Posture and Non-Contact Lower Limb Injury in Young Male Amateur Football Players: A Prospective Cohort Study" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 12: 6424. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18126424

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