Special Issue "Health, Physical Activity and Performance in Youth"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Exercise and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Panagiota (Nota) Klentrou
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Kinesiology, Brock University, St.Catharines, Ontario, L2S 3A1 Canada
Interests: pediatric exercise science; sports science; exercise physiology; bone metabolism; nutrition

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A Special Issue on Health, Physical Activity, and Performance in Youth is being organized in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. More detailed information is presented on the journal website, please refer to https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph.

Physical activity (PA) and exercise enhance the optimal development and functioning of the musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. PA is also known to confer benefits such as improvement in weight control, mental health and mood, ability to perform daily activities, and life span, as well as a reduction in the risk of cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes, metabolic syndrome, certain cancers, osteoporosis, and falls. Furthermore, physical inactivity has been known to lead to a sedentary lifestyle that in turn may lead to overweight or obesity. Physical inactivity is also known to have adverse health effects. Therefore, adequate PA is considered important for good health.

Youth is an important period for establishing healthy habits for healthy adulthood. For example, approximately 80% of obese youth grow into obese adults. The results of previous studies also suggest that PA during childhood and adolescence is a key contributor to the overall health trajectory. In addition, appropriate training methods are important to help youth athletes stay healthy while improving their athletic performance.

This Special Issue is open to any contributions in the subject area of physical activity, performance, and youth health. The keywords listed below provide an outline of some of the possible areas of interest.

Prof. Dr. Panagiota (Nota) Klentrou
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Youth
  • Exercise science
  • Exercise training
  • Health
  • Health risk behaviors
  • Physical activity
  • Athletic performance
  • Sport participation
  • Exercise interventions

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Preliminary Effects of a Multi-Recess School Intervention: Using Accelerometers to Measure Physical Activity Patterns in Elementary Children
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(23), 8919; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17238919 - 30 Nov 2020
Abstract
This pilot study used accelerometers to investigate the effectiveness of a multiple recess school intervention on physical activity patterns in younger elementary children using a post-test only with nonequivalent groups design. First and second grade students (N = 157) participating in a [...] Read more.
This pilot study used accelerometers to investigate the effectiveness of a multiple recess school intervention on physical activity patterns in younger elementary children using a post-test only with nonequivalent groups design. First and second grade students (N = 157) participating in a larger study, the LiiNK Project® (Let’s inspire innovation ‘N Kids), wore accelerometers for the duration of the school day for two weeks to measure physical activity intensity and number of steps taken daily. Students attended either an intervention school (N = 90), participating in four 15-min unstructured, outdoor recesses and one 15-min character development lesson daily, or a control school (N = 67), participating in two 15-min unstructured, outdoor recesses daily and no character development program. The intervention students, grades 1 and 2, took more steps (p < 0.001) and time spent in moderate (p < 0.001) and vigorous (p < 0.001) physical activity (MVPA) than the control school students. Intervention students averaged approximately 900 more steps per day than the control school students. These results show young children given 60 min of recess daily continue to increase physical activity patterns over those with 30 min of recess daily. Next steps are to evaluate if children demonstrate healthier body fat levels as a result of these higher patterns of MVPA daily. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health, Physical Activity and Performance in Youth)
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Open AccessArticle
Health-Risk Behavior-, Mental Health-, and Physical Exercise-Related Risk Factors for Tooth Fractures in Korean Adolescents
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 7815; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17217815 - 26 Oct 2020
Abstract
We aimed to determine factors related to tooth fracture experience in Korean adolescents. This study used data from the 14th Korea Youth Risk Behavior Survey in 2018, a cross-sectional web-based survey of health-risk behaviors among a representative sample of Korean middle- and high-school [...] Read more.
We aimed to determine factors related to tooth fracture experience in Korean adolescents. This study used data from the 14th Korea Youth Risk Behavior Survey in 2018, a cross-sectional web-based survey of health-risk behaviors among a representative sample of Korean middle- and high-school students aged 12–17 years. A total of 60,040 participants were selected using a complex sampling design of the survey from 400 middle schools and 400 high schools. They answered a self-administered questionnaire survey in classrooms. Explanatory variables included those pertaining to health-risk behaviors, mental health, and physical exercise. Complex-sample multivariable logistic regression models were applied to identify factors related to tooth fracture experience in the past 12 months. The overall prevalence of dental fracture experience was 11.4%. Risk factors related to tooth fractures in Korean adolescents were unhealthy behaviors such as alcohol and tobacco consumption; mental health problems including stress, depression, and suicidal ideation; and intensive physical exercise. The major risk factor related to tooth fractures was depression. To prevent tooth fractures among adolescents, schools should strengthen mental health education, encourage mouthguard use during intensive physical exercise, and develop school environments to prevent orofacial injuries. Further studies on various risk factors related to tooth fractures are warranted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health, Physical Activity and Performance in Youth)
Open AccessArticle
Effects of Post-Exercise Whey Protein Consumption on Recovery Indices in Adolescent Swimmers
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 7761; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17217761 - 23 Oct 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Purpose: This study examined the effect of whey protein consumption following high-intensity interval swimming (HIIS) on muscle damage, inflammatory cytokines and performance in adolescent swimmers. Methods: Fifty-four swimmers (11–17 years-old) were stratified by age, sex and body mass to a whey [...] Read more.
Purpose: This study examined the effect of whey protein consumption following high-intensity interval swimming (HIIS) on muscle damage, inflammatory cytokines and performance in adolescent swimmers. Methods: Fifty-four swimmers (11–17 years-old) were stratified by age, sex and body mass to a whey protein (PRO), isoenergetic carbohydrate (CHO) or a water/placebo (H2O) group. Following baseline blood samples (06:00 h) and a standardised breakfast, participants performed a maximal 200 m swim, followed by HIIS. A total of two post-exercise boluses were consumed following HIIS and ~5 h post-baseline. Blood and 200 m performance measurements were repeated at 5 h, 8 h and 24 h from baseline. Muscle soreness was assessed at 24 h. Creatine kinase (CK), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-10 (IL-10) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were measured in plasma. Results: No difference in 200 m swim performance was observed between groups. CK activity was elevated at 5 h compared to baseline and 24 h and at 8 h compared to all other timepoints, with no differences between groups. Muscle soreness was lower in PRO compared to H2O (p = 0.04). Anti-inflammatory IL-10 increased at 8 h in PRO, while it decreased in CHO and H2O. Conclusions: Post-exercise consumption of whey protein appears to have no additional benefit on recovery indices following HIIS compared to isoenergetic amounts of carbohydrate in adolescent swimmers. However, it may assist with the acute-inflammatory response. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health, Physical Activity and Performance in Youth)
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