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Article

Effect of Copper Sulphate and Cadmium Chloride on Non-Human Primate Sperm Function In Vitro

1
Department of Medical Bioscience, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535, South Africa
2
PUDAC-Delft Animal Facility, South African Medical Research Council, Cape Town 7505, South Africa
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Mei-Fang Chien
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(12), 6200; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18126200
Received: 9 April 2021 / Revised: 18 May 2021 / Accepted: 21 May 2021 / Published: 8 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Evaluation and Health Impact of Toxic Metals Pollution)
In order to address the large percentage of unexplained male infertility in humans, more detailed investigations using sperm functional tests are needed to identify possible causes for compromised fertility. Since many environmental and lifestyle factors might be contributing to infertility, future studies aiming to elucidate the effect of such factors on male fertility will need the use of appropriate research models. The current study aimed to assess the effects of two heavy metals, namely copper sulphate, and cadmium chloride, on non-human primate (NHP) sperm function in order to establish the possibility of using these primate species as models for reproductive studies. Our combined results indicated that the functionality of NHP spermatozoa is inhibited by the two heavy metals investigated. After in vitro exposure, detrimental effects, and significant lowered values (p < 0.05) were obtained for sperm motility, viability and vitality, acrosome intactness, and hyperactivation. These metals, at the tested higher concentrations, therefore, have the ability to impair sperm quality thereby affecting sperm fertilizing capability in both humans and NHPs. View Full-Text
Keywords: sperm motility; sperm vitality; hyperactivation; acrosome integrity; vervet monkey; chacma baboon; rhesus monkey sperm motility; sperm vitality; hyperactivation; acrosome integrity; vervet monkey; chacma baboon; rhesus monkey
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hardneck, F.; de Villiers, C.; Maree, L. Effect of Copper Sulphate and Cadmium Chloride on Non-Human Primate Sperm Function In Vitro. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 6200. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18126200

AMA Style

Hardneck F, de Villiers C, Maree L. Effect of Copper Sulphate and Cadmium Chloride on Non-Human Primate Sperm Function In Vitro. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(12):6200. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18126200

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hardneck, Farren, Charon de Villiers, and Liana Maree. 2021. "Effect of Copper Sulphate and Cadmium Chloride on Non-Human Primate Sperm Function In Vitro" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 12: 6200. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18126200

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