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Article

Sleep Quality and Mental Disorder Symptoms among Canadian Public Safety Personnel

1
Anxiety and Illness Behaviours Laboratory, Department of Psychology, University of Regina, Regina, SK S4S 0A2, Canada
2
Department of Sociology, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Saint John’s, NL A1C 5S7, Canada
3
Department of Kinesiology & Physical Education, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, ON N2L 3C5, Canada
4
Office of Applied Research and Graduate Studies, Justice Institute of British Columbia, New Westminster, BC V3L 5T4, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(8), 2708; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082708
Received: 3 March 2020 / Revised: 8 April 2020 / Accepted: 9 April 2020 / Published: 15 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stress, Prevention, and Resilience among First Responders)
Poor sleep quality is associated with numerous mental health concerns and poorer overall physical health. Sleep disturbances are commonly reported by public safety personnel (PSP) and may contribute to the risk of developing mental disorders or exacerbate mental disorder symptoms. The current investigation was designed to provide estimates of sleep disturbances among PSP and explore the relationship between sleep quality and mental health status. PSP completed screening measures for sleep quality and diverse mental disorders through an online survey. Respondents (5813) were grouped into six categories: communications officials, correctional workers, firefighters, paramedics, police officers, and Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP). Many PSP in each category reported symptoms consistent with clinical insomnia (49–60%). Rates of sleep disturbances differed among PSP categories (p < 0.001, ω = 0.08). Sleep quality was correlated with screening measures for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, anxiety, social anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and alcohol use disorder for all PSP categories (r = 0.18–0.70, p < 0.001). PSP who screened positive for insomnia were 3.43–6.96 times more likely to screen positive for a mental disorder. All PSP reported varying degrees of sleep quality, with the lowest disturbances found among firefighters and municipal/provincial police. Sleep appears to be a potentially important factor for PSP mental health. View Full-Text
Keywords: public safety personnel; mental disorder symptoms; sleep; mental health; physical health; insomnia public safety personnel; mental disorder symptoms; sleep; mental health; physical health; insomnia
MDPI and ACS Style

Angehrn, A.; Teale Sapach, M.J.N.; Ricciardelli, R.; MacPhee, R.S.; Anderson, G.S.; Carleton, R.N. Sleep Quality and Mental Disorder Symptoms among Canadian Public Safety Personnel. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 2708. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082708

AMA Style

Angehrn A, Teale Sapach MJN, Ricciardelli R, MacPhee RS, Anderson GS, Carleton RN. Sleep Quality and Mental Disorder Symptoms among Canadian Public Safety Personnel. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(8):2708. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082708

Chicago/Turabian Style

Angehrn, Andréanne, Michelle J.N. Teale Sapach, Rosemary Ricciardelli, Renée S. MacPhee, Gregory S. Anderson, and R. N. Carleton 2020. "Sleep Quality and Mental Disorder Symptoms among Canadian Public Safety Personnel" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 8: 2708. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082708

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