Special Issue "Stress, Prevention, and Resilience among First Responders"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Mental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 September 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Konstantinos Papazoglou
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Trauma Section, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA
Interests: police stress; trauma; moral injury; compassion fatigue; health; training; resilience
Dr. Katy Kamkar
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) & Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 2G8, Canada
Interests: anxiety; depression; operational stress injury; PTSD; workplace mental health and wellbeing; resiliency; prevention; intervention; return to work
Dr. Olivia Johnson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Illinois Department of Health—Suicide Prevention Alliance, Belleville, IL 62226, USA
Interests: law enforcement suicide; first responder wellness and resilience; suicide prevention; mental health
Dr. Chuck Russo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Criminal Justice, American Public University System, Charles Town, WV 25414, USA
Interests: post-traumatic stress; emerging technology applications in public safety; officer stress; officer resilience; training; non-government intelligence actors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

First responders are exposed to a plethora of critical incidents over the course of their career. Current scholarly research has shown that first responders experience different types of stress. Despite their exposure to adversities, first responders have proven to be more resilient compared to the general population. However, exposure to critical incidents may often have negative impact on first responders’ health, wellbeing, and job performance. The role of preventative interventions is imperative in helping first responders recover following exposure to adversities, hence maintaining resilient trajectories over the course of their career.

This Special Issue aims to provide the readers with valuable information with regards to the multidimensional nature of stress among first responders. In addition, some papers in this Special Issue will focus on resilience and the exploration of how resilience can be studied in first responders; in addition, the application of resilience promotion interventions will be studied and discussed in some of the manuscripts included in this Special Issue. Moreover, the current Special Issue encompasses the term “prevention” to emphasize the important role of prevention or preventative interventions in helping first responders cope with efficiency in the exposure to challenges they experience in the line of duty. All scholars whose work focuses on this present topic are more than welcome to submit their manuscripts for peer review. The Special Issue is an open access one, meaning that professionals, policy makers, leaders, and students who are interested in first responders’ work will have access to this Special Issue with no additional fees. In addition, this Special Issue will be indexed in some of the major databases; therefore, academicians, researchers, instructors, and scholars interested in the topic explored in the current Special Issue will have a unique opportunity to study the papers published in this Special Issue. 

That being said, we would like to invite you to send us your manuscript (IJERPH offers different types of manuscripts, including theoretical essays) for consideration for publication in our Special Issue. Your manuscript will initially go through the peer-reviewed process before publication is approved. You may submit anything related to the topic and the work you have been doing. Please feel free to invite other co-authors to collaborate with you on the completion of your manuscripts.

Dr. Konstantinos Papazoglou
Dr. Katy Kamkar
Dr. Olivia Johnson
Dr. Chuck Russo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • stress
  • prevention
  • resilience
  • first responders
  • critical incidents
  • performance
  • health
  • interventions

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Assessing the Relative Impact of Diverse Stressors among Public Safety Personnel
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(4), 1234; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041234 - 14 Feb 2020
Abstract
Public Safety Personnel (PSP; e.g., correctional workers and officers, firefighters, paramedics, police officers, and public safety communications officials (e.g., call center operators/dispatchers)) are regularly exposed to potentially psychologically traumatic events (PPTEs). PSP also experience other occupational stressors, including organizational (e.g., staff shortages, inconsistent [...] Read more.
Public Safety Personnel (PSP; e.g., correctional workers and officers, firefighters, paramedics, police officers, and public safety communications officials (e.g., call center operators/dispatchers)) are regularly exposed to potentially psychologically traumatic events (PPTEs). PSP also experience other occupational stressors, including organizational (e.g., staff shortages, inconsistent leadership styles) and operational elements (e.g., shift work, public scrutiny). The current research quantified occupational stressors across PSP categories and assessed for relationships with PPTEs and mental health disorders (e.g., anxiety, depression). The participants were 4820 PSP (31.7% women) responding to established self-report measures for PPTEs, occupational stressors, and mental disorder symptoms. PPTEs and occupational stressors were associated with mental health disorder symptoms (ps < 0.001). PSP reported substantial difficulties with occupational stressors associated with mental health disorder symptoms, even after accounting for diverse PPTE exposures. PPTEs may be inevitable for PSP and are related to mental health; however, leadership style, organizational engagement, stigma, sleep, and social environment are modifiable variables that appear significantly related to mental health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stress, Prevention, and Resilience among First Responders)

Review

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Open AccessReview
New Directions in Police Academy Training: A Call to Action
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(24), 4941; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16244941 - 06 Dec 2019
Abstract
The complexities of modern policing require law enforcement agencies to expand how officers are trained to do their jobs. It is not sufficient for training to focus solely on the law or on perishable skills; such as arrest and control; defensive tactics; driving; [...] Read more.
The complexities of modern policing require law enforcement agencies to expand how officers are trained to do their jobs. It is not sufficient for training to focus solely on the law or on perishable skills; such as arrest and control; defensive tactics; driving; and firearms. The present manuscript addresses the critical importance of infusing academy training with the psychological skills essential for officers to meet the contemporary challenges of police work. The authors suggest that the skills (i.e., cognitive; emotional; social; and moral) discussed in this paper may improve officers’ wellness as well as promote relationships between police officers and community members. Specific methods of incorporating these skills in academy training are offered. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stress, Prevention, and Resilience among First Responders)
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