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A Literature Review on Psychosocial Support for Disaster Responders: Qualitative Synthesis with Recommended Actions for Protecting and Promoting the Mental Health of Responders

1
Research Institute of Nursing Care for People and Community, University of Hyogo, 13-71 Kitaoji-cho, Akashi, Hyogo 673-8588, Japan
2
Graduate School of Health Sciences, Kobe University, 7-10-2 Tomogaoka, Suma-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 654-0142, Japan
3
Graduate School of Nursing Art and Science, University of Hyogo, 13-71 Kitaoji-cho, Akashi, Hyogo 673-8588, Japan
4
School of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, Syarif Hidayatullah State Islamic University, Jl. Kertamukti No.5 Cireundeu CiputatTangerang Selatan, Banten 15419, Indonesia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(6), 2011; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17062011
Received: 3 February 2020 / Revised: 16 March 2020 / Accepted: 16 March 2020 / Published: 18 March 2020
Little scientific evidence exists on ways to decrease the psychological stress experienced by disaster responders, or how to maintain and improve their mental health. In an effort to grasp the current state of research, we examined research papers, agency reports, the manuals of aid organisations, and educational materials, in both English and Japanese. Using MEDLINE, Ichushi-Web (Japanese search engine), Google Scholar, websites of the United Nations agencies, and the database of the Grants System for Japan’s Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare, 71 pertinent materials were identified, 49 of which were analysed. As a result, 55 actions were extracted that could potentially protect and improve the mental health of disaster responders, leading to specific recommendations. These include (1) during the pre-activity phase, enabling responders to anticipate stressful situations at a disaster site and preparing them to monitor their stress level; (2) during the activity phase, engaging in preventive measures against on-site stress; (3) using external professional support when the level of stress is excessive; and (4) after the disaster response, getting back to routines, sharing of experiences, and long-term follow-up. Our results highlighted the need to offer psychological support to disaster responders throughout the various phases of their duties. View Full-Text
Keywords: disaster responders; support; psychosocial; risk management disaster responders; support; psychosocial; risk management
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MDPI and ACS Style

Umeda, M.; Chiba, R.; Sasaki, M.; Agustini, E.N.; Mashino, S. A Literature Review on Psychosocial Support for Disaster Responders: Qualitative Synthesis with Recommended Actions for Protecting and Promoting the Mental Health of Responders. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 2011. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17062011

AMA Style

Umeda M, Chiba R, Sasaki M, Agustini EN, Mashino S. A Literature Review on Psychosocial Support for Disaster Responders: Qualitative Synthesis with Recommended Actions for Protecting and Promoting the Mental Health of Responders. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(6):2011. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17062011

Chicago/Turabian Style

Umeda, Maki; Chiba, Rie; Sasaki, Mie; Agustini, Eni N.; Mashino, Sonoe. 2020. "A Literature Review on Psychosocial Support for Disaster Responders: Qualitative Synthesis with Recommended Actions for Protecting and Promoting the Mental Health of Responders" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 6: 2011. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17062011

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