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Open AccessArticle

How Neoliberalism Shapes Indigenous Oral Health Inequalities Globally: Examples from Five Countries

1
Indigenous Oral Health Unit, University of Adelaide Dental School, Adelaide 5005, Australia
2
College of Dentistry, University of Saskatchewan, E3350-107 Wiggins Road, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E4, Canada
3
Auckland Regional Hospital & Specialist Dentistry, Auckland District Health Board, 1023 Auckland, New Zealand
4
Center on Alcoholism, Department of Psychology, Substance Abuse, & Addiction, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(23), 8908; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17238908
Received: 9 October 2020 / Revised: 25 November 2020 / Accepted: 26 November 2020 / Published: 30 November 2020
Evidence suggests that countries with neoliberal political and economic philosophical underpinnings have greater health inequalities compared to less neoliberal countries. But few studies examine how neoliberalism specifically impacts health inequalities involving highly vulnerable populations, such as Indigenous groups. Even fewer take this perspective from an oral health viewpoint. From a lens of indigenous groups in five countries (the United States, Canada, Australia, Aotearoa/New Zealand and Norway), this commentary provides critical insights of how neoliberalism, in domains including colonialism, racism, inter-generational trauma and health service provision, shapes oral health inequalities among Indigenous societies at a global level. We posit that all socially marginalised groups are disadvantaged under neoliberalism agendas, but that this is amplified among Indigenous groups because of ongoing legacies of colonialism, institutional racism and intergenerational trauma. View Full-Text
Keywords: indigenous; neoliberalism; oral health; Māori; aboriginal; Torres Strait Islander; Sámi; Alaskan Native; Native American; First Nations; Inuit; Métis indigenous; neoliberalism; oral health; Māori; aboriginal; Torres Strait Islander; Sámi; Alaskan Native; Native American; First Nations; Inuit; Métis
MDPI and ACS Style

Jamieson, L.; Hedges, J.; McKinstry, S.; Koopu, P.; Venner, K. How Neoliberalism Shapes Indigenous Oral Health Inequalities Globally: Examples from Five Countries. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 8908. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17238908

AMA Style

Jamieson L, Hedges J, McKinstry S, Koopu P, Venner K. How Neoliberalism Shapes Indigenous Oral Health Inequalities Globally: Examples from Five Countries. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(23):8908. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17238908

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jamieson, Lisa; Hedges, Joanne; McKinstry, Sheri; Koopu, Pauline; Venner, Kamilla. 2020. "How Neoliberalism Shapes Indigenous Oral Health Inequalities Globally: Examples from Five Countries" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 23: 8908. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17238908

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Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

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