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Article

Recognizing Your Hand and That of Your Romantic Partner

by *,†, and §
Center for Applied Psychological Science, Kwansei Gakuin University, Nishinomiya 662-8501, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current Address: Faculty of Systems Design, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hino 191-0065, Japan.
Current Address: Faculty of International Studies, Kindai University, Higashiosaka 577-8502, Japan.
§
Current Address: Graduate School of Human Sciences, Osaka University, Suita 565-0871, Japan.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 8256; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218256
Received: 24 September 2020 / Revised: 26 October 2020 / Accepted: 5 November 2020 / Published: 9 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Translational Aspects of Motor Imagery)
Although the hand is an important organ in interpersonal interactions, focusing on this body part explicitly is less common in daily life compared with the face. We investigated (i) whether a person’s recognition of their own hand is different from their recognition of another person’s hand (i.e., self hand vs. other’s hand) and (ii) whether a close social relationship affects hand recognition (i.e., a partner’s hand vs. an unknown person’s hand). For this aim, we ran an experiment in which participants took part in one of two discrimination tasks: (i) a self–others discrimination task or (ii) a partner/unknown opposite-sex person discrimination task. In these tasks, participants were presented with a hand image and asked to select one of two responses, self (partner) or other (unknown persons), as quickly and accurately as possible. We manipulated hand ownership (self (partner)/other(unknown person)), hand image laterality (right/left), and visual perspective of hand image (upright/upside-down). A main effect of hand ownership in both tasks (i.e., self vs. other and partner vs. unknown person) was found, indicating longer reaction times for self and partner images. The results suggest that close social relationships modulate hand recognition—namely, “self-expansion” to a romantic partner could occur at explicit visual hand recognition. View Full-Text
Keywords: hand recognition; self-other discrimination; social relationship hand recognition; self-other discrimination; social relationship
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MDPI and ACS Style

Fukui, T.; Murayama, A.; Miura, A. Recognizing Your Hand and That of Your Romantic Partner. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 8256. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218256

AMA Style

Fukui T, Murayama A, Miura A. Recognizing Your Hand and That of Your Romantic Partner. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(21):8256. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218256

Chicago/Turabian Style

Fukui, Takao, Aya Murayama, and Asako Miura. 2020. "Recognizing Your Hand and That of Your Romantic Partner" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 21: 8256. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218256

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