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Open AccessArticle

Patterns and Predictors of Insufficient Antenatal Care Utilization in Nigeria over a Decade: A Pooled Data Analysis Using Demographic and Health Surveys

1
Department of Global Public Health, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden
2
World Health Programme, Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue (UQAT), Québec, QC J9X 5E4, Canada
3
Department of Demography and Social Statistics, Faculty of Social Sciences, Federal University Oye Ekiti, Oye-Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria
4
School of International Development and Global Studies, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5, Canada
5
The George Institute for Global Health, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 8261; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218261
Received: 9 October 2020 / Revised: 31 October 2020 / Accepted: 5 November 2020 / Published: 9 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ensure Healthy Lives and Promote Wellbeing for All at All Ages)
This study investigated the patterns of antenatal care (ANC) utilization and insufficient use of ANC as well as its association with some proximate socio-demographic factors. This was a cross-sectional study using pooled data Nigeria Demographic and Health Surveys from years 2008, 2013 and 2018. Participants were 52,654 women of reproductive age who reported at least one birth in the five years preceding the surveys. The outcome variables were late attendance, first contact after first trimester and less than four antenatal visits using multivariable logistic regression analysis. The overall prevalence of late timing was 74.8% and that of insufficient ANC visits was 46.7%. In the multivariable regression analysis; type of residency, geo-political region, educational level, household size, use of contraceptives, distance to health service, exposure to the media and total number of children were found to be significantly associated with both late and insufficient ANC attendance. About half of the pregnant women failed to meet the recommendation of four ANC visits. Investing on programs to improve women’s socio-economic status, addressing the inequities between urban and rural areas of Nigeria in regard to service utilization, and controlling higher fertility rates may facilitate the promotion of ANC service utilization in Nigeria. View Full-Text
Keywords: antenatal care; maternal health care utilization; global health; Nigeria demographic and health survey antenatal care; maternal health care utilization; global health; Nigeria demographic and health survey
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MDPI and ACS Style

El-Khatib, Z.; Kolawole Odusina, E.; Ghose, B.; Yaya, S. Patterns and Predictors of Insufficient Antenatal Care Utilization in Nigeria over a Decade: A Pooled Data Analysis Using Demographic and Health Surveys. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 8261. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218261

AMA Style

El-Khatib Z, Kolawole Odusina E, Ghose B, Yaya S. Patterns and Predictors of Insufficient Antenatal Care Utilization in Nigeria over a Decade: A Pooled Data Analysis Using Demographic and Health Surveys. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(21):8261. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218261

Chicago/Turabian Style

El-Khatib, Ziad; Kolawole Odusina, Emmanuel; Ghose, Bishwajit; Yaya, Sanni. 2020. "Patterns and Predictors of Insufficient Antenatal Care Utilization in Nigeria over a Decade: A Pooled Data Analysis Using Demographic and Health Surveys" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 21: 8261. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218261

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