Next Article in Journal
Availability, Promotion, and Signs of Alcohol Consumption: A Mixed Methods Study of Perceived Exposure and Objective Measures
Next Article in Special Issue
Profile Pictures in the Digital World: Self-Photographs Predict Better Life Satisfaction
Previous Article in Journal
Early Gestational Exposure to High-Molecular-Weight Phthalates and Its Association with 48-Month-Old Children’s Motor and Cognitive Scores
Previous Article in Special Issue
Combating Fear of Missing Out (FoMO) on Social Media: The FoMO-R Method
Article

Developing and Testing a Scale Designed to Measure Perceived Phubbing

Hankamer School of Business, Baylor University, One Bear Place 98007, Waco, TX 76798, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 8152; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218152
Received: 16 September 2020 / Revised: 8 October 2020 / Accepted: 27 October 2020 / Published: 4 November 2020
Phubbing (phone snubbing) has become a commonplace behavior. The more we are phubbed the more likely we are to phub others. The extraordinary attention-grabbing ability of the smartphone would only be an interesting story if not for its impact on social media use and, ultimately, stress and depression. In Study 1 (n = 258, Mage = 20), we develop a parsimonious and valid measure of phubbing. Extant “phubbing” measures all lack important qualities needed to be able to assess phubbing with a brief and valid scale that can be replicated and used in a variety of research settings. In Study 2 (n = 157, Mage = 39), we test and extend the David and Roberts (2017) phubbing model, while further validating our perceived phubbing measure. We use Social Exchange Theory and Kardefelt-Winther’s (2014) model of compensatory internet use as theoretical support for our expected findings. Results find that phubbed individuals experience a sense of social exclusion that, paradoxically, is associated with an increased use of social media. This increased use of social media is associated with higher reported levels of anxiety and depression. Future research directions and study limitations are discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: phubbing; smartphones; social exclusion; social media; anxiety; depression phubbing; smartphones; social exclusion; social media; anxiety; depression
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

David, M.E.; Roberts, J.A. Developing and Testing a Scale Designed to Measure Perceived Phubbing. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 8152. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218152

AMA Style

David ME, Roberts JA. Developing and Testing a Scale Designed to Measure Perceived Phubbing. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(21):8152. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218152

Chicago/Turabian Style

David, Meredith E., and James A. Roberts 2020. "Developing and Testing a Scale Designed to Measure Perceived Phubbing" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 21: 8152. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218152

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop