Next Article in Journal
Optimising Web-Based Computer-Tailored Physical Activity Interventions for Prostate Cancer Survivors: A Randomised Controlled Trial Examining the Impact of Website Architecture on User Engagement
Next Article in Special Issue
Femicide Fatal Risk Factors: A Last Decade Comparison between Italian Victims of Femicide by Age Groups
Previous Article in Journal
Risk Prediction Models for Melanoma: A Systematic Review on the Heterogeneity in Model Development and Validation
Previous Article in Special Issue
Downside: The Perpetrator of Violence in the Representations of Social and Health Professionals
Article

“Kept in Check”: Representations and Feelings of Social and Health Professionals Facing Intimate Partner Violence (IPV)

Department of Humanities, University of Naples “Federico II”, 80133 Naples, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 7910; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17217910
Received: 20 September 2020 / Revised: 18 October 2020 / Accepted: 24 October 2020 / Published: 28 October 2020
Social and health professionals facing gender-based violence in Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) express feelings and thoughts closely connected to their place of work and the users of their services. However, research on professionals’ reflexivity and their implications has not been closely investigated. Therefore, this article will describe representations of IPV among social and health professionals facing gender-based violence as well as their personal feelings in accomplishing their job. Fifty interviews with health and social professionals were analyzed using grounded theory methodology supported by Atlas.ti 8.4. Five macrocategories will describe this phenomenon, leading to the final explicative core category that summarizes professionals’ attitudes toward it. Being “kept in check” among partners, partners and families, services, and institutional duties is the core category that best expressed their feelings. Therefore, implications for services and training will be further discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: IPV (intimate partner violence); gender-based violence; social and health professionals’ feelings and thoughts towards IPV; reflexivity; specialized training; treatments IPV (intimate partner violence); gender-based violence; social and health professionals’ feelings and thoughts towards IPV; reflexivity; specialized training; treatments
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Di Napoli, I.; Carnevale, S.; Esposito, C.; Block, R.; Arcidiacono, C.; Procentese, F. “Kept in Check”: Representations and Feelings of Social and Health Professionals Facing Intimate Partner Violence (IPV). Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 7910. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17217910

AMA Style

Di Napoli I, Carnevale S, Esposito C, Block R, Arcidiacono C, Procentese F. “Kept in Check”: Representations and Feelings of Social and Health Professionals Facing Intimate Partner Violence (IPV). International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(21):7910. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17217910

Chicago/Turabian Style

Di Napoli, Immacolata, Stefania Carnevale, Ciro Esposito, Roberta Block, Caterina Arcidiacono, and Fortuna Procentese. 2020. "“Kept in Check”: Representations and Feelings of Social and Health Professionals Facing Intimate Partner Violence (IPV)" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 21: 7910. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17217910

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop