Next Article in Journal
Occupational Assessments of Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Diseases in Labors: An Application of Metabolic Syndrome Scoring Index
Next Article in Special Issue
Nutritional Composition of Gluten-Free Labelled Foods in the Slovenian Food Supply
Previous Article in Journal
Misalignment of Stakeholder Incentives in the Opioid Crisis
Previous Article in Special Issue
Prevalence and Credibility of Nutrition and Health Claims: Policy Implications from a Case Study of Mongolian Food Labels
Article

Snacks and The City: Unexpected Low Sales of an Easy-Access, Tasty, and Healthy Snack at an Urban Snacking Hotspot

1
Department of Social, Health and Organizational Psychology, Utrecht University, 3584 CS Utrecht, The Netherlands
2
Department of Experimental Psychology, Helmholtz Institute, Utrecht University, 3584 CS Utrecht, The Netherlands
3
Chair Group Consumption and Healthy Lifestyles, Wageningen University & Research, 6708 PB Wageningen, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(20), 7538; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17207538
Received: 28 August 2020 / Revised: 8 October 2020 / Accepted: 13 October 2020 / Published: 16 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food and Public Health: Food Supply, Marketing and Consumers)
While many people declare an intention to eat and snack more healthily, a large body of research has found that these intentions often do not translate into actual behavior. This failure to fulfil intentions is regularly attributed to the obesogenic environment, on which basis it is assumed that changing the food environment may lead to more healthy snacking behavior. To test this premise in real life practice, the present research project investigated whether making a healthy snack easy-to-access in an urban environment characterized by unhealthy snacking would support people in their intentions of purchasing more healthy snacks. The urban snack project consisted of three phases. In Phase 1, a hotspot location for unhealthy snacking was determined by using a Global Positioning System to track people’s snacking locations and a survey to verify the location. In Phase 2, an attractive snack was developed that met consumers’ criteria of what constituted a healthy and tasty snack, together with corresponding branding that also included a small food truck from which to sell the newly developed snacks. In Phase 3, the snack was sold from the food truck located at the previously determined unhealthy snacking hotspot. We counted the number of snacks sold and canvassed people’s opinions about the snack and its branding, finding that in spite of people’s appreciation for the snack, the food truck, and the branding, actual sales of the snack were very low. In the Discussion, we name predominant eating and purchasing habits as possible reasons for these low sales. Future research could focus on placing the healthy snack directly beside people’s habitual snack purchase location to ensure that the new choice gets better recognized. Overall, the findings suggest that merely placing healthy snacks more prominently in people’s food environment is not sufficient to lead people to snack more healthily. View Full-Text
Keywords: nutrition education; public health; urban field experiment; nudging intervention; food marketing nutrition education; public health; urban field experiment; nudging intervention; food marketing
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Schlinkert, C.; Gillebaart, M.; Benjamins, J.; Poelman, M.P.; de Ridder, D. Snacks and The City: Unexpected Low Sales of an Easy-Access, Tasty, and Healthy Snack at an Urban Snacking Hotspot. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 7538. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17207538

AMA Style

Schlinkert C, Gillebaart M, Benjamins J, Poelman MP, de Ridder D. Snacks and The City: Unexpected Low Sales of an Easy-Access, Tasty, and Healthy Snack at an Urban Snacking Hotspot. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(20):7538. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17207538

Chicago/Turabian Style

Schlinkert, Caroline, Marleen Gillebaart, Jeroen Benjamins, Maartje P. Poelman, and Denise de Ridder. 2020. "Snacks and The City: Unexpected Low Sales of an Easy-Access, Tasty, and Healthy Snack at an Urban Snacking Hotspot" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 20: 7538. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17207538

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop