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Article

Congenital Zika Syndrome—Assessing the Need for a Family Support Programme in Brazil

1
International Centre for Evidence on Disability, Department of Clinical Research, Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, UK
2
Instituto Nacional de Saúde da Mulher, da Criança e do Adolescente Fernandes Figueira, Rio de Janeiro 22250-020, Brazil
3
Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Institute of Health Sciences, Federal University of Bahia, Salvador 40110-902, Brazil
4
Murdoch Children’s Research Institute and Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(10), 3559; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17103559
Received: 15 April 2020 / Revised: 12 May 2020 / Accepted: 14 May 2020 / Published: 19 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child and Adolescent Health in a Life-Course Perspective)
The Zika outbreak in Brazil caused congenital impairments and developmental delays, or Congenital Zika Syndrome (CZS). We sought to ascertain whether a family support programme was needed and, if so, could be adapted from the Getting to Know Cerebral Palsy programme (GTKCP) designed for children with cerebral palsy (CP). We conducted a systematic review of the needs of families of children with CZS or CP in low- and middle-income countries and reviewed the findings of the Social and Economic Impact of Zika study. We undertook a scoping visit to three facilities offering services to children with CZS in Brazil to understand potential utility and adaptability of GTKCP. The literature review showed that caregivers of children with CZS experience challenges in mental health, healthcare access, and quality of life, consistent with the CP literature. The scoping visits demonstrated that most support provided to families was medically orientated and while informal support networks were established, these lacked structure. Caregivers and practitioners expressed an eagerness for more structure community-based family support programmes. A support programme for families of children with CZS in Brazil appeared relevant and needed, and may fill an important gap in the Zika response. View Full-Text
Keywords: congenital zika syndrome; Zika; family support; Brazil; cerebral palsy; community programme congenital zika syndrome; Zika; family support; Brazil; cerebral palsy; community programme
MDPI and ACS Style

Duttine, A.; Smythe, T.; Ribiero Calheiro de Sá, M.; Ferrite, S.; Zuurmond, M.; Moreira, M.E.; Collins, A.; Milner, K.; Kuper, H. Congenital Zika Syndrome—Assessing the Need for a Family Support Programme in Brazil. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 3559. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17103559

AMA Style

Duttine A, Smythe T, Ribiero Calheiro de Sá M, Ferrite S, Zuurmond M, Moreira ME, Collins A, Milner K, Kuper H. Congenital Zika Syndrome—Assessing the Need for a Family Support Programme in Brazil. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(10):3559. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17103559

Chicago/Turabian Style

Duttine, Antony, Tracey Smythe, Míriam Ribiero Calheiro de Sá, Silvia Ferrite, Maria Zuurmond, Maria E. Moreira, Anna Collins, Kate Milner, and Hannah Kuper. 2020. "Congenital Zika Syndrome—Assessing the Need for a Family Support Programme in Brazil" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 10: 3559. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17103559

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