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Sleep Quality among Police Officers: Implications and Insights from a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Literature

1
Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology, Genetics and Maternal/Child Sciences, University of Genoa, Polyclinic Hospital San Martino IRCCS, 16132 Genoa, Italy
2
Clinical trial Office, E.O. Galliera Hospital, 16128 Genoa, Italy
3
UNESCO Chair of Anthropology of Health - Biosphere and Healing System, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa, Italy
4
Department of Woman/Child & Public Health, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Fondazione Policlinico Gemelli IRCCS, 00168 Roma, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(5), 885; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16050885
Received: 16 January 2019 / Revised: 28 February 2019 / Accepted: 7 March 2019 / Published: 11 March 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep Disorders Across the Lifespan: A Different Perspective)
Poor sleep is associated with bad health outcomes, worse wellbeing and decreases in performance, productivity and safety at work. Police officers are exposed to several risk factors including extended work schedules, shift work, occupational stress, dangerous and traumatic events and can, as such, develop sleep problems. The aim of the present study was to analyze the sleep quality among police officers. A systematic literature search, in PubMed/MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Scopus, ISI/Web of Science (WoS) and the Cochrane Library was conducted. Original articles, published in English, French, Italian, Spanish and Portuguese, the primary objective of which was the evaluation of the quality of sleep through the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) in Police Forces, were selected. From an initial sample of 1,149 studies, 13 articles were included in the meta-analysis (3,722 police officers). The pooled prevalence of bad sleep quality in police officers was 51% [95%CI 42–60%]. The pooled global score of the PSQI was 5.6 [95%CI 5.0–6.3], corresponding to a low average quality. At the meta-regressions, statistically significant associations could be found for work seniority (in terms of years of service) and being on shift. The poor quality of sleep in police officers could have negative consequences for workers’ health and for the safety of third parts. The implementation of health and sleep hygiene promotion programs in police forces is strongly recommended. View Full-Text
Keywords: police; sleep; occupational health; meta-analysis; prevalence; public health; sleep deprivation; health promotion; sleep hygiene police; sleep; occupational health; meta-analysis; prevalence; public health; sleep deprivation; health promotion; sleep hygiene
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Garbarino, S.; Guglielmi, O.; Puntoni, M.; Bragazzi, N.L.; Magnavita, N. Sleep Quality among Police Officers: Implications and Insights from a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Literature. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 885.

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