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Article

Hand Hygiene Compliance Study at a Large Central Hospital in Vietnam

1
Pennsylvania State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA 17033, USA
2
Department of Public Health Sciences, Pennsylvania State University, Hershey, PA 17033, USA
3
Department of Infection Control, Hue Central Hospital, Thua Thien Hue 70000, Vietnam
4
Division of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA 17033, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(4), 607; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16040607
Received: 10 December 2018 / Revised: 11 February 2019 / Accepted: 13 February 2019 / Published: 19 February 2019
Lack of proper hand hygiene among healthcare workers has been identified as a core facilitator of hospital-acquired infections. Although the concept of hand hygiene quality assurance was introduced to Vietnam relatively recently, it has now become a national focus in an effort to improve the quality of care. Nonetheless, barriers such as resources, lack of education, and cultural norms may be limiting factors for this concept to be properly practiced. Our study aimed to assess the knowledge and attitude of healthcare workers toward hand hygiene and to identify barriers to compliance, as per the World Health Organization’s guidelines, through surveys at a large medical center in Vietnam. In addition, we aimed to evaluate the compliance rate across different hospital departments and the roles of healthcare workers through direct observation. Results showed that, in general, healthcare workers had good knowledge of hand hygiene guidelines, but not all believed in receiving reminders from patients. The barriers to compliance were identified as: limited resources, patient overcrowding, shortage of staff, allergic reactions to hand sanitizers, and lack of awareness. The overall compliance was 31%; physicians had the lowest rate of compliance at 15%, while nurses had the highest rate at 39%; internal medicine had the lowest rate at 16%, while the intensive care unit had the highest rate at 40%. In summary, it appears that addressing cultural attitudes in addition to enforcing repetitive quality assurance and assessment programs are needed to ensure adherence to safe hand washing. View Full-Text
Keywords: hand washing; quality improvement; Vietnam; quality assessment hand washing; quality improvement; Vietnam; quality assessment
MDPI and ACS Style

Le, C.D.; Lehman, E.B.; Nguyen, T.H.; Craig, T.J. Hand Hygiene Compliance Study at a Large Central Hospital in Vietnam. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 607. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16040607

AMA Style

Le CD, Lehman EB, Nguyen TH, Craig TJ. Hand Hygiene Compliance Study at a Large Central Hospital in Vietnam. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(4):607. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16040607

Chicago/Turabian Style

Le, Cam D., Erik B. Lehman, Thanh H. Nguyen, and Timothy J. Craig. 2019. "Hand Hygiene Compliance Study at a Large Central Hospital in Vietnam" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 4: 607. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16040607

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