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Electrophysiological Correlates of an Alcohol-Cued Go/NoGo Task: A Dual-Process Approach to Binge Drinking in University Students

Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychobiology, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Spain
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(22), 4550; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16224550
Received: 10 October 2019 / Revised: 10 November 2019 / Accepted: 14 November 2019 / Published: 18 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alcohol Use Among Adolescents and Young People)
Binge drinking is a common pattern of alcohol consumption in adolescence and youth. Neurocognitive dual-process models attribute substance use disorders and risk behaviours during adolescence to an imbalance between an overactivated affective-automatic system (involved in motivational and affective processing) and a reflective system (involved in cognitive inhibitory control). The aim of the present study was to investigate at the electrophysiological level the degree to which the motivational value of alcohol-related stimuli modulates the inhibition of a prepotent response in binge drinkers. First-year university students (n = 151, 54 % females) classified as binge drinkers (n = 71, ≥6 binge drinking episodes, defined as 5/7 standard drinks per occasion in the last 180 days) and controls (n = 80, <6 binge drinking episodes in the last 180 days) performed a beverage Go/NoGo task (pictures of alcoholic and nonalcoholic drinks were presented according to the condition as Go or NoGo stimuli; Go probability = 0.75) during event-related potential recording. In binge drinkers but not controls, the amplitude of the anterior N2-NoGo was larger in response to nonalcohol than in response to alcohol pictures. No behavioural difference in task performance was observed. In terms of dual-process models, binge drinkers may require increased activation to monitor conflict in order to compensate for overactivation of the affective-automatic system caused by alcohol-related bias. View Full-Text
Keywords: alcohol consumption; binge drinking; adolescence; dual-process model; response inhibition; neurocognitive; event-related potentials; Go/NoGo alcohol consumption; binge drinking; adolescence; dual-process model; response inhibition; neurocognitive; event-related potentials; Go/NoGo
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MDPI and ACS Style

Blanco-Ramos, J.; Cadaveira, F.; Folgueira-Ares, R.; Corral, M.; Rodríguez Holguín, S. Electrophysiological Correlates of an Alcohol-Cued Go/NoGo Task: A Dual-Process Approach to Binge Drinking in University Students. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 4550. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16224550

AMA Style

Blanco-Ramos J, Cadaveira F, Folgueira-Ares R, Corral M, Rodríguez Holguín S. Electrophysiological Correlates of an Alcohol-Cued Go/NoGo Task: A Dual-Process Approach to Binge Drinking in University Students. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(22):4550. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16224550

Chicago/Turabian Style

Blanco-Ramos, Javier; Cadaveira, Fernando; Folgueira-Ares, Rocío; Corral, Montserrat; Rodríguez Holguín, Socorro. 2019. "Electrophysiological Correlates of an Alcohol-Cued Go/NoGo Task: A Dual-Process Approach to Binge Drinking in University Students" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 16, no. 22: 4550. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16224550

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