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Local Challenges and Successes Associated with Transitioning to Sustainable Food System Practices for a West Australian Context: Multi-Sector Stakeholder Perceptions

1
School of Medical and Health Science, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup 6027, Australia
2
Perth Natural Resource Management, Perth 6104, Australia
3
Commonland, 103 Amsterdam, The Netherlands
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Centre for Social Impact, University of Western Australia, Crawley 6009, Australia
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Faculty of Higher Education, William Angliss Institute, Melbourne 3000, Australia
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Sustain, The Australian Food Network, Melbourne 3000, Australia
7
Geography and Environment, University of the Fraser Valley, Abbotsford, BC V2S 7M8, Canada
8
Centre for Ecosystem Management, School of Science, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup 6027, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(11), 2051; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16112051
Received: 9 May 2019 / Revised: 2 June 2019 / Accepted: 6 June 2019 / Published: 10 June 2019
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PDF [307 KB, uploaded 10 June 2019]

Abstract

Large-scale food system practices have diminished soil and water quality and negatively impacted climate change. Yet, numerous opportunities exist to harness food system practices that will ensure better outcomes for human health and ecosystems. The objective of this study was to consider food Production, Processing, Access and Consumption domains, and for each determine the challenges and successes associated with progressing towards a sustainable food system. A workshop engaging 122 participants including producers, consultants, consumers, educators, funders, scientists, media, government and industry representatives, was conducted in Perth, Western Australia. A thematic analysis of statements (Successes (n = 170) or Challenges (n = 360)) captured, revealed issues of scale, knowledge and education, economics, consumerism, big food, environmental/sustainability, communication, policies and legislation, and technology and innovations. Policy recommendations included greater investment into research in sustainable agriculture (particularly the evidentiary basis for regenerative agriculture), land preservation, and supporting farmers to overcome high infrastructure costs and absorb labour costs. Policy, practice and research recommendations included focusing on an integrated food systems approach with multiple goals, food system actors working collaboratively to reduce challenges and undertaking more research to further the regenerative agriculture evidence. View Full-Text
Keywords: food system; food security; sustainable agriculture; regenerative agriculture; food system actors; challenges; successes; food supply food system; food security; sustainable agriculture; regenerative agriculture; food system actors; challenges; successes; food supply
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Sambell, R.; Andrew, L.; Godrich, S.; Wolfgang, J.; Vandenbroeck, D.; Stubley, K.; Rose, N.; Newman, L.; Horwitz, P.; Devine, A. Local Challenges and Successes Associated with Transitioning to Sustainable Food System Practices for a West Australian Context: Multi-Sector Stakeholder Perceptions. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 2051.

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